Volunteer Job Descriptions

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Support Services

Volunteer work in this discipline will involve one or more of the following: administrative duties, web master, photographer, tool cache “quartermaster,” food services, trail adopter/coordinator, work planning, public hike/social leader, land acquisition, landowner relations liaison, membership outreach events, and shuttle driver. It is understood that some of these job descriptions may overlap or be applicable in more than one situation at a time. Please select the best/closest fit to the anticipated job. Work supervisor or VIP coordinator check all that apply:
  • Administrative Duties: any activity that is office-based in nature, including records-keeping and documentation tasks; entering or updating membership data, writing minutes of meetings, articles for newsletters, or other journaling tasks; ordering, purchasing, inventorying, or sorting office supplies or other such materials; computer-related tasks (other than website creation/maintenance); general correspondence and mailings; attendance at various conferences and meetings, etc. (JHA #9)
  • Web Master: creation of trail/chapter websites, or updates to existing websites as an assigned “Web Master” task (member-created article submissions to trail journals or websites should be tracked under Administrative Duties). (JHA #9)
  • GPS/Mapping: any activity in the field or office setting which involves GPS and/or mapping of the Trail. (JHA #9)
  • Photography: any photography, digital or otherwise, that is specifically undertaken in support of trail business (i.e.: promotional displays, photos to support websites or news articles, etc.). Time spent by volunteers taking photos strictly for personal enjoyment should not be recorded as volunteer hours under this category. (No JHA Applies)
  • Tool Cache Quartermaster: any volunteer time dedicated to the care, maintenance, storage, distribution, transportation, cleaning, repair or inventory of tools. (JHA #2)
  • Food Service: any volunteer time related to the purchase, preparation, serving, or clean-up of meals/food associated with trail meetings, work days, or promotional events. (JHA #7)
  • Trail Adopter/Coordinator: any volunteer time associated with oversight of a particular trail section, including patrol/inspection of trail conditions, coordination with chapter leaders to plan for and work toward desired future conditions, research into possible problem-solving actions for specific trail segments, etc. (No JHA Applies)
  • Work Planning: volunteer time related to general planning efforts and pre-workday logistics for trail construction, repair, or maintenance for non-Trail Adopter segments or issues. (No JHA Applies)
  • Public Hike/Social Leader: any volunteer time focused on leading public hikes, providing interpretive or “guide” messages about the surrounding area to guest hikers, planning or coordinating social events or gatherings for chapter members, etc. (No JHA Applies)
  • Land Acquisition: any volunteer time focusing on the research of available, desirable land for acquisition along possible trail routes, or the actual work of pursuing property through purchase, donation, granting of easements, etc. (No JHA Applies)
  • Landowner Relations Liaison: any volunteer work which establishes, promotes, or otherwise maintains and fosters good relationships between private landowners and the Ice Age National Scenic Trail and its associated chapters. (No JHA Applies)
  • Outreach Events/Membership Drives: any volunteer time spent promoting the trail, recruiting membership to trail chapters, and other such general outreach efforts (i.e.: staffing a booth at a local event in order to promote the trail, recruit volunteers for chapter work & membership, etc). (No JHA Applies)
  • Shuttle Driver: operating a vehicle to transport volunteers or
    tools/supplies/equipment in support of trail work, membership events, etc.
    (JHA #8)
Cumulative list of JHA’s for Support Services: #2, 7, 8, and 9.

Tools commonly used in Support Services may include: motor vehicles, cooking
implements, GPS equipment, cameras, telephones, FAX machines, computers,
keyboards, and common office supplies such as staplers, scissors, and writing
implements.

Physical Demands involved with Support Services range from light exertion to arduous
exertion depending upon the task. Volunteers and the work they perform will be
appropriately matched regarding their personal interests and abilities. In general, trail
maintenance often involves frequent stooping, lifting, reaching, bending, carrying, and repetitive motion. Distances walked may frequently exceed several miles per day, often while carrying tools or other equipment. Objects weighing more than 50 pounds may need to be lifted or otherwise moved.

Working conditions involved with Support Services most frequently occurs indoors, although some tasks may encompass all types of weather, from hot and humid to wet and cold. Outdoor work may occur across uneven terrain, including hills, slopes, grades, and wetlands in both forested and open areas, which may present numerous slipping and tripping hazards such as rocks and tree roots, mossy stones or logs, mud and water, or loose gravel. Exposure to long periods of standing, sitting, sunlight, wind, dust/dirt, insects, motor noise, or exhaust is possible.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for Support Services may include: first aid kit, sturdy work gloves, and sturdy leather work boots for any outdoor task or when working with tools; ergonomic work stations and wrist supports for office settings; hair coverings, sanitary plastic gloves, and oven mitts/hot pads for food preparation or handling.

Job Hazard Analysis (JHAs) will be made available by the Work Leader or VIP Coordinator to each volunteer for the specific work being performed (whenever appropriate and identified above), and will be covered during “tailgate” safety briefings. Additionally, safety considerations such as proper hydration, heat disorders, hypothermia, insect/animal bites & stings, and Lyme disease awareness should be discussed as appropriate given the local work environment, season, and geographic location. Refer to “Tailgate Safety Series” materials for talking points on these subjects.

 

Trail Construction and/or Repair

Volunteer work performed in this discipline will involve one or more of the following: flagging proposed trail routes, constructing trail tread, bridge construction, boardwalk construction, culvert placement, puncheon construction, causeway/turnpike construction, Coweeta dip construction, retaining wall construction, stiles construction, water bar construction, the construction of various support structures such as shelters/lean-to’s, parking areas, trail head facilities, information kiosks, installation of trail signs, and posting of trail blazes and boundary markers. All work will be done to standards as defined in the Ice Age Trail Handbook for Trail Design, Construction and Maintenance. Daily work may involve any or all of these specific tasks at various dates and times:
  • Flag Route: (No JHA Identified).
  • Trail Tread/Causeway/Turnpike: (JHA # 1, 2).
  • Coweeta Dips: (JHA # 2).
  • Culverts: Comply with permit restrictions if applicable. (JHA #1, 2).
  • Puncheons: Note: local trail construction traditions/preferences may favor boardwalks vs. puncheons, or vice versa. (JHA # 1, 2, 6).
  • Boardwalks: Comply with permit restrictions if applicable. (JHA # 1, 2, 6).
  • Bridges: Comply with permit restrictions if applicable. (JHA #1, 2, 6).
  • Retaining Wall: (JHA # 1, 2).
  • Stiles: Choose either Step Stile, Turnstile, or Dodgeway construction/repair to best suit local conditions and landowner preferences/requirements. (JHA #2).
  • Water Bars: (JHA #2).
  • Support Structures (Shelters, Kiosks, etc.): (JHA # 1, 2).
  • Parking Areas/Trailheads: (JHA # 2, 3, 6).
  • Signs/Markers: (JHA # 2, 4).
  • Blazes: both paint and nail-on type blazes must conform to specifications as defined in the Ice Age Trail Handbook for Trail Design, Construction and Maintenance (Chapter 7 in either Handbook). (JHA # 4).
  • Cumulative list of JHA’s: #1, 2, 3, 4, and 6.
Tools commonly used in Trail Construction or Repair may include one or more of the following, depending upon complexity of the task and training/certification of the volunteer: clinometer, DR Field Mower® or Trimmer, side-discharge lawn mower, chainsaw, brushsaw, Pulaski, McLeod, Council Rake, pick mattock, cutter mattock, Hazel Hoe, Suwanee Sling, shovel, lopper, pruning saw, bow saw, crosscut saw, pole pruner/saw, axe, weed whip, crow bar, wheel barrow, sledge hammer, various hand tools (both manual and power, i.e.: screwdrivers, circular saws, claw hammers, drills, etc.), jack, adze, spud, measuring wheel, post hole digger, log carrier, Peavy or Cant Hook, cable winch, and rigging.

Physical Demands involved with Trail Construction or Repair range from light exertion to arduous exertion depending upon the task. Volunteers and the work they perform will be appropriately matched regarding their personal interests and abilities. In general, trail construction or repair often involves frequent stooping, lifting, reaching, bending, carrying, and repetitive motion. Distances walked may frequently exceed several miles per day, often while carrying tools or other equipment. Objects weighing more than 50 pounds may need to be lifted or otherwise moved.

Working conditions involved with Trail Construction or Repair may encompass all types of weather, from hot and humid to wet and cold. Work will occur across uneven terrain, including hills, slopes, grades, and wetlands in both forested and open areas, which may present numerous slipping and tripping hazards such as rocks and tree roots, mossy stones or logs, mud and water, or loose gravel. Exposure to long periods of sunlight, wind, dust/dirt, insects, motor noise, exhaust, gas/paint fumes is possible.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for Trail Construction or Repair includes: first aid kit, sturdy work gloves, and sturdy leather work boots. Use of any gasoline-operated power tool/equipment will also require the proper use of eye protection and hearing protection. Additionally, in the case of chainsaw operation, a hard hat and saw chaps are also required for the faller (boots, gloves, hard hat, eye protection, and hearing protection required for “swampers”). Individual volunteers and work crews are strongly encouraged to carry cellular phones, radios, or other communication devices whenever and wherever possible/practical in case of emergencies.

Job Hazard Analysis (JHAs) will be made available by the Work Leader or VIP Coordinator to each volunteer for the specific work being performed, and will be covered during “tailgate” safety briefings. Additionally, safety considerations such as proper hydration, heat disorders, hypothermia, insect/animal bites & stings, and Lyme disease awareness should be discussed as appropriate given the local work environment, season, and geographic location. Refer to “Tailgate Safety Series” materials for talking points on these subjects.
 

Trail Maintenance

Volunteer work performed in this discipline will involve one or more of the following: mowing, brushing, pruning, sawing, re-painting tree blazes, clearing culverts of debris, water bar rehabilitation, and litter pickup. All work is to be done to standards in the Ice Age Trail Handbook for Trail Design, Construction and Maintenance. Daily work may involve any or all of these specific tasks at various dates and times:
  • Prune/Brush: (JHA #2).
  • Mowing: May be accomplished by either side-discharge lawn mower, motorized weed-eater, or non-motorized weed whips, dependent upon size/complexity of job, and skill level/certification of operator. (JHA #3).
  • Sawing: clear trail of downed trees, large branches, or hazardous leaning trees. May be accomplished by either chainsaw or non-motorized saw, dependent upon size/complexity of job, and skill level/certification of saw operator. Chainsaw operators must have current certification through an approved course/instructor, as well as current certification in First Aid and CPR. (JHA #2, 6).
  • Blazes: repaint/replace tree blazes that are faded or missing. (JHA #4).
  • Culverts: clear culverts of all debris so that proper water flow/drainage is restored. (JHA #1, 2).
  • Water Bars: (JHA #2).
  • Litter: Remove debris from old dump sites located along the trail, and/or pick up current trash found along trail segments. (JHA # 5).
Cumulative list of JHA’s: #1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6.

Tools commonly used in Trail Maintenance may include one or more of the following, depending upon complexity of the task and training/certification of the volunteer: DR Field Mower® or Trimmer, side-discharge lawn mower, chainsaw, brushsaw, Pulaski, McLeod, Council Rake, pick mattock, cutter mattock, Hazel Hoe, Suwanee Sling, shovel, lopper, hand pruner, pruning saw, bow saw, crosscut saw, pole pruner/saw, axe, weed whip, crow bar, wheel barrow, and paint brush.

Physical Demands involved with Trail Maintenance range from light exertion to arduous exertion depending upon the task. Volunteers and the work they perform will be appropriately matched regarding their personal interests and abilities. In general, trail maintenance often involves frequent stooping, lifting, reaching, bending, carrying, and repetitive motion. Distances walked may frequently exceed several miles per day, often while carrying tools or other equipment. Objects weighing more than 50 pounds may need to be lifted or otherwise moved.

Working conditions involved with Trail Maintenance may encompass all types of weather, from hot and humid to wet and cold. Work will occur across uneven terrain, including hills, slopes, grades, and wetlands in both forested and open areas, which may present numerous slipping and tripping hazards such as rocks and tree roots, mossy stones or logs, mud and water, or loose gravel. Exposure to long periods of sunlight, wind, dust/dirt, insects, motor noise, exhaust, or gas/paint fumes is possible.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for Trail Maintenance tasks includes: first aid kit, sturdy work gloves, and sturdy leather work boots. Use of any gasoline-operated power tool/equipment will also require the proper use of eye protection and hearing protection. Additionally, in the case of chainsaw operation, a hard hat and saw chaps are also required for the faller (boots, gloves, hard hat, eye protection, and hearing protection required for “swampers”). Individual volunteers and work crews are strongly encouraged to carry cellular phones, radios, or other communication devices whenever and wherever possible/practical in case of emergencies.

Job Hazard Analysis (JHAs) will be made available by the Work Leader or VIP Coordinator to each volunteer for the specific work being performed, and will be covered during “tailgate” safety briefings. Additionally, safety considerations such as proper hydration, heat disorders, hypothermia, insect/animal bites & stings, and Lyme disease awareness should be discussed as appropriate given the local work environment, season, and geographic location. Refer to “Tailgate Safety Series” materials for talking points on these subjects.


 

Vegetation Management

Volunteer work performed in this discipline will involve one or more of the following: plant species identification, marking individual plants or plant colonies, cutting seed heads, seed collection, plant removal by hand/mechanical techniques, and application of non-restricted herbicides. The use of burning or prescribed fire is not authorized for volunteer activities performed under the National Park Service’s Volunteers-In-Parks Program at Ice Age National Scenic Trail. Daily work may involve any or all of these specific tasks at various dates and times:
  • Identification: survey/inspect area to identify exotic and/or invasive plant species, document all findings by method(s) appropriate to the circumstance (record observations in notebook, plot areas/species on maps, plot sites by GPS unit, etc.). (No JHA Identified).
  • Marking: if control/eradication efforts must occur at later date, mark the individual plant, or plant colony, by method appropriate to the circumstance (ribbon/flagging, paint blazes, GPS, etc.). (JHA #4).
  • Clip Seed Heads: using hand-held tools, collect seed heads in a bucket or sealed container to remove from site. (JHA #2).
  • Cut Plants: remove plants, shrubs, or trees, either partially or by cutting at ground level, using either power tools (mowers or weed eaters, chainsaws, etc.) or manual tools (weed whips, hand clippers, etc.). Chainsaw operators must have current certification through an approved course/instructor, as well as current certification in First Aid and CPR. (JHA #2, 3, 6).
  • Dig Up Plants: remove plants, including root wads to ensure the plant will not regrow, using shovels and other hand tools. If plants have seed heads, be sure to clip and contain them or other wise ensure seeds do not spread prior to digging up plant. Ground disturbing work requires Cultural Resources clearance to the same extent as trail construction requirements. (JHA #2).
  • Herbicide Application: apply chemicals to control or eradicate undesired vegetation. This work will only be performed by staff and volunteers who have the proper trainings and certifications. It will be conducted in accordance with all applicable laws, permits and regulations, and following label requirements, including use of personal protective equipment. All persons working with herbicides should receive a briefing on information provided on Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS), and MSDS’s should be available for their review. (JHA #10).
  • Native Seed Collection: using hands or hand-held tools, collect seed heads in a bucket or sealed container for drying and subsequent restoration efforts. Care must be taken to collect native seed only. (JHA #2).
Cumulative list of JHA’s: #2, 3, 4, 6 and 10.

Tools commonly used in Vegetation Management may include one or more of the following, depending upon complexity of the task and training/certification of the volunteer: power mower or trimmer, chainsaw, brushsaw, weed wrench, Pulaski, Hazel Hoe, shovel, lopper, hand pruner, bow saw, crosscut saw, paint brush, and herbicide applicator/spray tank.

Physical Demands involved with Vegetation Management range from light exertion to arduous exertion, depending upon the task, but most commonly involves light to moderate physical effort. Volunteers and the work they perform will be appropriately matched regarding their personal interests and abilities. In general, invasive/exotic plant management often involves frequent stooping, lifting, reaching, bending, carrying, and repetitive motion. Distances walked may frequently exceed several miles per day, often while carrying tools or other equipment.

Working conditions involved with Vegetation Management may encompass all types of weather, from hot and humid to wet and cold. Work will occur across uneven terrain, including hills, slopes, grades, and wetlands in both forested and open areas, which may present numerous slipping and tripping hazards such as rocks and tree roots, mossy stones or logs, mud and water, or loose gravel. Exposure to long periods of sunlight, wind, dust/dirt, insects, motor noise, exhaust, gas/paint/chemical fumes is possible.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and Safety Equipment

General Field Work: Work gloves and sturdy work boots are required A first aid kit must be immediately available. Individual volunteers and work crews are strongly encouraged to wear the following as appropriate; eye protection when working around tall brush or low hanging branches, and long sleeve shirts and wide brimmed hats or hardhats for sun protection. They are also strongly encouraged to carry cellular phones, radios, or other communication devices whenever and wherever possible/practical in case of emergencies.

Power Tools/Equipment: In addition to the PPE listed for general field work volunteers operating or working in the immediate vicinity of power tools and/or equipment also requires the proper use of eye protection and hearing protection.

Chain Saws: Operators (“fallers”) will wear sturdy boots, gloves, hard hat, eye and ear protection, and saw chaps. Those assisting operators (“swampers”) will wear the same PPE, but saw chaps are not required. A first aid kit appropriate to chainsaw operations must be immediately available.

Herbicide Application: Any volunteer working with herbicides must use the following PPE; chemical resistant gloves, long pants, long sleeved shirt, eye protection, and sturdy leather work boots. They must also have a first aid kit and chemical spill kit immediately available. Other PPE must be used if required by label or applicable local, state, or federal regulations. A head covering is recommended (hat or cap, bandana, etc.). Rinse water and clean up facilities must be available in case of a spill.

Job Hazard Analysis (JHAs) will be made available by the Work Leader or VIP Coordinator to each volunteer for the specific work being performed, and will be covered during “tailgate” safety briefings. Additionally, safety considerations such as proper hydration, heat disorders, hypothermia, insect/animal bites & stings, and Lyme disease awareness should be discussed as appropriate given the local work environment, season, and geographic location. Refer to “Tailgate Safety Series” materials for talking points on these subjects.
 

Cumulative List of Job Descriptions

The following is a compilation of all Job Descriptions associated with volunteer work on the Ice Age National Scenic Trail. Volunteers working under a “group” Volunteer Services Agreement (Form 301A) at the Chapter or MSC level may perform any or all of these tasks at various times.

Major Job Description categories (i.e.: Support Services, Trail Maintenance, etc.) are also individually available on the NPS website (www.nps.gov/iatr) as well as the IATA partner website(www.iceagetrail.org) for use with 301A Volunteer Agreement Forms for instances where onetime or “episodic” volunteers are being recruited to perform specific, limited tasks which do not necessitate the use of this cumulative Job Description list.

Trail Construction and/or Repair Volunteer

Work performed in this discipline will involve one or more of the following: flagging proposed trail routes, constructing trail tread, bridge construction, boardwalk construction, culvert placement, puncheon construction, causeway/turnpike construction, Coweeta dip construction, retaining wall construction, stiles construction, water bar construction, the construction of various support structures such as shelters/lean-to’s, parking areas, trail head facilities, information kiosks, installation of trail signs, and posting of trail blazes and boundary markers. All work will be done to standards as defined in the Ice Age Trail Handbook for Trail Design, Construction and Maintenance. Daily work may involve any or all of these specific tasks at various dates and times:

  • Flag Route: (No JHA Identified).
  • Trail Tread/Causeway/Turnpike: (JHA # 1, 2).
  • Coweeta Dips: (JHA # 2).
  • Culverts: Comply with permit restrictions if applicable. (JHA #1, 2). 1 of 8
  • Puncheons: Note: local trail construction traditions/preferences may favor boardwalks vs. puncheons, or vice versa. (JHA # 1, 2, 6).
  • Boardwalks: Comply with permit restrictions if applicable. (JHA # 1, 2, 6).
  • Bridges: Comply with permit restrictions if applicable. (JHA #1, 2, 6).
  • Retaining Wall: (JHA # 1, 2).
  • Stiles: Choose either Step Stile, Turnstile, or Dodgeway construction/repair to best suit local conditions and landowner preferences/requirements. (JHA #2).
  • Water Bars: (JHA #2).
  • Support Structures (Shelters, Kiosks, etc.): (JHA # 1, 2).
  • Parking Areas/Trailheads: (JHA # 2, 3, 6).
  • Signs/Markers: (JHA # 2, 4).
  • Blazes: both paint and nail-on type blazes must conform to specifications as defined in the Ice Age Trail Handbook for Trail Design, Construction and Maintenance (Chapter 7 ). (JHA # 4).
Cumulative list of JHA’s for Trail Construction/Repair: #1, 2, 3, 4, and 6

Tools commonly used in Trail Construction or Repair may include one or more of the following, depending upon complexity of the task and training/certification of the volunteer: clinometer, DR Field Mower® or Trimmer, side-discharge lawn mower, chainsaw, brushsaw, Pulaski, McLeod, Council Rake, pick mattock, cutter mattock, Hazel Hoe, Suwanee Sling, shovel, lopper, pruning saw, bow saw, crosscut saw, pole pruner/saw, axe, weed whip, crow bar, wheel barrow, sledge hammer, various hand tools (both manual and power, i.e.: screwdrivers, circular saws, claw hammers, drills, etc.), jack, adze, spud, measuring wheel, post hole digger, log carrier, Peavy or Cant Hook, cable winch, and rigging.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for Trail Construction or Repair includes: first aid kit, sturdy work gloves, and sturdy leather work boots. Use of any gasoline-operated power tool/equipment will also require the proper use of eye protection and hearing protection. Additionally, in the case of chainsaw operation, a hard hat and saw chaps are also required for the faller (boots, gloves, hard hat, eye protection, and hearing protection required for “swampers”). Individual volunteers and work crews are strongly encouraged to carry cellular phones, radios, or other communication devices whenever and wherever possible/practical in case of emergencies.

Trail Maintenance

Volunteer work performed in this discipline will involve one or more of the following: mowing, brushing, pruning, sawing, re-painting tree blazes, clearing culverts of debris, water bar rehabilitation, and litter pickup. All work is to be done to standards in the Ice Age Trail Handbook for Trail Design, Construction and Maintenance. Daily work may involve any or all of these specific tasks at various dates and times:
  • Prune/Brush: (JHA #2).
  • Mowing: May be accomplished by either side-discharge lawn mower, motorized weed-eater, or non-motorized weed whips, dependent upon size/complexity of job, and skill level/certification of operator. (JHA #3).
  • Sawing: clear trail of downed trees, large branches, or hazardous leaning trees. May be accomplished by either chainsaw or non-motorized saw, dependent upon size/complexity of job, and skill level/certification of saw operator. Chainsaw operators must have current certification through an approved course/instructor, as well as current certification in First Aid and CPR. (JHA #2, 6).
  • Blazes: repaint/replace tree blazes that are faded or missing. (JHA #4)
  • Culverts: clear culverts of all debris so that proper water flow/drainage is restored. (JHA #1, 2).
  • Water Bars: (JHA #2).
  • Litter: Remove debris from old dump sites located along the trail, and/or pick up current trash found along trail segments. (JHA # 5).
Cumulative list of JHA’s for Trail Maintenance: #1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6.

Tools commonly used in Trail Maintenance may include one or more of the following, depending upon complexity of the task and training/certification of the volunteer: DR Field Mower® or Trimmer, sidedischarge lawn mower, chainsaw, brushsaw, Pulaski, McLeod, Council Rake, pick mattock, cutter mattock, Hazel Hoe, Suwanee Sling, shovel, lopper, hand pruner, pruning saw, bow saw, crosscut saw, pole pruner/saw, axe, weed whip, crow bar, wheel barrow, and paint brush.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for Trail Maintenance tasks includes: first aid kit, sturdy work gloves, and sturdy leather work boots. Use of any gasoline-operated power tool/equipment will also require the proper use of eye protection and hearing protection. Additionally, in the case of chainsaw operation, a hard hat and saw chaps are also required for the faller (boots, gloves, hard hat, eye protection, and hearing protection required for “swampers”). Individual volunteers and work crews are strongly encouraged to carry cellular phones, radios, or other communication devices whenever and wherever possible/practical in case of emergencies.

Support Services

Volunteer work in this discipline will involve one or more of the following: administrative duties, Web Master, photographer, tool cache “Quartermaster,” food services, Trail Adopter/Coordinator, work planning, public hike/social leader, land acquisition, landowner relations liaison, membership outreach events, and shuttle driver. It is understood that some of these job descriptions may overlap or be applicable in more than one situation at a time. Please select the best/closest fit to the anticipated job. Work Supervisor or VIP Coordinator check all that apply:
  • Administrative Duties: any activity that is office-based in nature, including records-keeping and documentation tasks; entering or updating membership data, writing minutes of meetings, articles for newsletters, or other journaling tasks; ordering, purchasing, inventorying, or sorting office supplies or other such materials; computer-related tasks (other than website creation/maintenance); general correspondence and mailings; attendance at various conferences and meetings, etc. (JHA #9)
  • Web Master: creation of trail/chapter websites, or updates to existing websites as an assigned “Web Master” task (member-created article submissions to trail journals or websites should be tracked under Administrative Duties). (JHA #9)
  • GPS/Mapping: any activity in the field or office setting which involves GPS and/or mapping of the Trail. (JHA #9)
  • Photography: any photography, digital or otherwise, that is specifically undertaken in support of trail business (i.e.: promotional displays, photos to support websites or news articles, etc.). Time spent by volunteers taking photos strictly for personal enjoyment should not be recorded as volunteer hours under this category. (No JHA Applies)
  • Tool Cache Quartermaster: any volunteer time dedicated to the care, maintenance, storage, distribution, transportation, cleaning, repair or inventory of tools. (JHA #2)
  • Food Service: any volunteer time related to the purchase, preparation, serving, or clean-up of meals/food associated with trail meetings, work days, or promotional events. (JHA #7)
  • Trail Adopter/Coordinator: any volunteer time associated with oversight of a particular trail section, including patrol/inspection of trail conditions, coordination with chapter leaders to plan for and work toward desired future conditions, research into possible problem-solving actions for specific trail segments, etc. (No JHA Applies)
  • Work Planning: volunteer time related to general planning efforts and pre-work day logistics for trail construction, repair, or maintenance for non-Trail Adopter segments or issues. (No JHA Applies)
  • Public Hike/Social Leader: any volunteer time focused on leading public hikes, providing interpretive or “guide” messages about the surrounding area to guest hikers, planning or coordinating social events or gatherings for chapter members, etc. (No JHA Applies)
  • Land Acquisition: any volunteer time focusing on the research of available, desirable land for acquisition along possible trail routes, or the actual work of pursuing property through purchase, donation, granting of easements, etc. (No JHA Applies)
  • Landowner Relations Liaison: any volunteer work which establishes, promotes, or otherwise maintains and fosters good relationships between private landowners and the Ice Age National Scenic Trail and its associated chapters. (No JHA Applies)
  • Outreach Events/Membership Drives: any volunteer time spent promoting the trail, recruiting membership to trail chapters, and other such general outreach efforts (i.e.: staffing a booth at a local event in order to promote the trail, recruit volunteers for chapter work & membership, etc). (No JHA Applies)
  • Shuttle Driver: operating a vehicle to transport volunteers or tools/supplies/equipment in support of trail work, membership events, etc. (JHA #8)
Cumulative list of JHA’s for Support Services: #2, 7, 8, and 9.

Tools commonly used in Support Services may include: motor vehicles, cooking implements, GPS equipment, cameras, telephones, FAX machines, computers, keyboards, and common office supplies such as staplers, scissors, and writing implements.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for Support Services may include: first aid kit, sturdy work gloves, and sturdy leather work boots for any outdoor task or when working with tools; ergonomic work stations and wrist supports for office settings; hair coverings, sanitary plastic gloves, and oven mitts/hot pads for food preparation or handling.

Vegetation Management

Volunteer work performed in this discipline will involve one or more of the following: plant species identification, marking individual plants or plant colonies, cutting seed heads, seed collection, plant removal by hand/mechanical techniques, and application of non-restricted herbicides. The use of burning or prescribed fire is not authorized for volunteer activities performed under the National Park Service’s Volunteers-In-Parks Program at Ice Age National Scenic Trail. Daily work may involve any or all of these specific tasks at various dates and times:
  • Identification: survey/inspect area to identify exotic and/or invasive plant species, document all findings by method(s) appropriate to the circumstance (record observations in notebook, plot areas/species on maps, plot sites by GPS unit, etc.). (No JHA Identified).
  • Marking: if control/eradication efforts must occur at later date, mark the individual plant, or plant colony, by method appropriate to the circumstance (ribbon/flagging, paint blazes, GPS, etc.). (JHA #4).
  • Clip Seed Heads: using hand-held tools, collect seed heads in a bucket or sealed container to remove from site. (JHA #2).
  • Cut Plants: remove plants, shrubs, or trees, either partially or by cutting at ground level, using either power tools (mowers or weed eaters, chainsaws, etc.) or manual tools (weed whips, hand clippers, etc.). Chainsaw operators must have current certification through an approved course/instructor, as well as current certification in First Aid and CPR. (JHA #2, 3, 6).
  • Dig Up Plants: remove plants, including root wads to ensure the plant will not re-grow, using shovels and other hand tools. If plants have seed heads, be sure to clip and contain them or other wise ensure seeds do not spread prior to digging up plant. Ground disturbing work requires Cultural Resources clearance to the same extent as trail construction requirements. (JHA #2).
  • Herbicide Application: apply chemicals to control or eradicate undesired vegetation. This work will only be performed by staff and volunteers who have the proper trainings and certifications. It will be conducted in accordance with all applicable laws, permits and regulations, and following label requirements, including use of personal protective equipment. All persons working with herbicides should receive a briefing on information provided on Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS), and MSDS’s should be available for their review. (JHA #10).
  • Native Seed Collection: using hands or hand-held tools, collect seed heads in a bucket or sealed container for drying and subsequent restoration efforts. Care must be taken to collect native seed only. (JHA #2).
Cumulative list of JHA’s for Vegetation Management: #2, 3, 4, 6 and 10.

Tools commonly used in Vegetation Management may include one or more of the following, depending upon complexity of the task and training/certification of the volunteer: power mower or trimmer, chainsaw, brushsaw, weed wrench, Pulaski, Hazel Hoe, shovel, lopper, hand pruner, bow saw, crosscut saw, paint brush, and herbicide applicator/spray tank.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and Safety Equipment for Vegetation Management
General Field Work: Work gloves and sturdy work boots are required A first aid kit must be immediately available. Individual volunteers and work crews are strongly encouraged to wear the following as appropriate; eye protection when working around tall brush or low hanging branches, and long sleeve shirts and wide brimmed hats or hardhats for sun protection. They are also strongly encouraged to carry cellular phones, radios, or other communication devices whenever and wherever possible/practical in case of emergencies.

Power Tools/Equipment: In addition to the PPE listed for general field work volunteers operating or working in the immediate vicinity of power tools and/or equipment also requires the proper use of eye protection and hearing protection.

Chain Saws: Operators (“fallers”) will wear sturdy boots, gloves, hard hat, eye and ear protection, and saw chaps. Those assisting operators (“swampers”) will wear the same PPE, but saw chaps are not required. A first aid kit appropriate to chainsaw operations must be immediately available.

Herbicide Application: Any volunteer working with herbicides must use the following PPE; chemical resistant gloves, long pants, long sleeved shirt, eye protection, and sturdy leather work boots. They must also have a first aid kit and chemical spill kit immediately available. Other PPE must be used if required by label or applicable local, state, or federal regulations. A head covering is recommended (hat or cap, bandana, etc.). Rinse water and clean up facilities must be available in case of a spill.

For All Job Descriptions:

Physical Demands range from light exertion to arduous exertion depending upon the task. Volunteers and the work they perform will be appropriately matched regarding their personal interests and abilities. In general, trail work often involves frequent stooping, lifting, reaching, bending, carrying, and repetitive motion. Distances walked may frequently exceed several miles per day, often while carrying tools or other equipment. Objects weighing more than 50 pounds may need to be lifted or otherwise moved.

Working conditions may encompass all types of weather, from hot and humid to wet and cold. Trail work will occur across uneven terrain, including hills, slopes, grades, and wetlands in both forested and open areas, which may present numerous slipping and tripping hazards such as rocks and tree roots, mossy stones or logs, mud and water, or loose gravel. Exposure to long periods of sunlight, wind, dust/dirt, insects, motor noise, exhaust, gas/paint fumes is possible. Administrative duties may be performed either indoors or outdoors, and may require long periods of sitting, bending, reaching, repetitive motion, and some amount of lifting.

Job Hazard Analysis’ (JHAs) are available from the Work Leader or VIP Coordinator. They are also available on the NPS and IATA partner websites listed at the beginning of this document. Volunteers are encouraged to review JHAs before starting any task to inform themselves of recommended safe work practices. Additionally, safety considerations such as proper hydration, heat disorders, hypothermia, insect/animal bites & stings, and Lyme disease awareness should be discussed by Work Leaders as appropriate considering the local work environment, season, and geographic location. Refer to “Tailgate Safety Series” materials for talking points on these subjects, also available on the NPS and IATA partner websites.

Last updated: September 12, 2021

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