Then And Now Pictures of the Battlefield

These Then-And-Now pictures bring together some of the more unforgettable pictures of post-battle Gettysburg with modern versions taken from the same location as the originals. For many, these photographs conjure feelings of awe and amazement along with sadness and despair. These feelings are often magnified when visitors realize they can stand on the same ground – and see the same things – that Alexander Gardner, Timothy O’Sullivan, James Gibson, and others did when they took their unforgettable images in 1863, 1913, and 1938. It is with these unforgettable photographs in mind, and a nod to the men whose timeless images evoke such strong emotions, that we bring you this page. This is our attempt to look back through the windows of time.

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Devil's Den

 
Sketch Artist Alfred Waud in Devil's Den
A Civil War sketch artist, Alfred Waud, sits atop a boulder in Devil's Den as he poses for a picture. The same rock that Alfred Waud sat on in 1863 looks nearly identical today.
Alfred Waud sits perched on a rock in Devil’s Den, overlooking the second day’s battlefield in front of him. Library of Congress.
The central boulder and surrounding boulders identify the exact spot where Waud sat in 1863. NPS Photo.
Alfred Waud was a sketch artist who worked for Harper’s Weekly magazine at the time of the Battle of Gettysburg. This photograph creates a fascinating juxtopostion between the long-standing artform of sketching and the new technology of the day in photography. It is likely that Alfred Waud and the photograpy team of Alexander Gardner, Timothy O'Sullivan, and James Gibson crossed paths during the Civil War and were aware of each others work. This photograph may have been a professional courtesy between the "war correspondents" of the day.  



 
Confederate Dead near Plum Run in the Slaughter Pen
Two dead Confederate soldiers lie on the bank of a small pond, surrounded by large boulders. The modern photograph of this area reveals the Plum Run footbridge and the slope of Little Round Top in the distance.
Two dead Confederate soldiers lie on the bank of a small pond, surrounded by large boulders. Library of Congress.
The modern photograph of this area reveals the Plum Run footbridge and the slope of Little Round Top in the distance. NPS Photo.
This photograph depicts two dead Confederate soldiers in the Slaughter Pen. Years of weather and traffic have shifted some of the rocks in this area, but enough has remained unchanged that the location can be easily determined. The terms “Slaughter Pen” and “Devil’s Den” were often used interchangeably following the battle, making some photographs difficult to place based on title alone.

William A. Frassanito, Early Photography at Gettysburg (Gettysburg: Thomas Publications, 1995), 279-286.
 



 
Posed Scene in the Slaughter Pen
A number of men posing as dead soldiers lie across and underneath rocks in the Slaughter Pen. The modern photo shows the same rocks, the now-wooded summit of Little Round Top in the background.
A number of men posing as dead soldiers lie across and underneath rocks in the Slaughter Pen. Library of Congress.
The modern photo shows the same rocks, the now-wooded summit of Little Round Top in the background. NPS Photo.
This photograph, taken by Peter Weaver on November 11, 1863, depicts a group of men posing as dead soldiers among rocks in the Slaughter Pen. The two men standing are doctors, posed as if inspecting the “bodies.” The summit of Little Round Top can be seen in the distance.

William A. Frassanito, Early Photography at Gettysburg (Gettysburg: Thomas Publications, 1995), 294-306.



 
Confederate “Sharpshooter” near Devil’s Den, Gardner Stereo #263
A dead soldier lies in front of rocks near Devil’s Den. The same rocks near Devil’s Den are unassuming today.
A dead soldier lies in front of rocks near Devil’s Den. Library of Congress.
The same rocks near Devil’s Den are unassuming today. NPS Photo.
There were six separate images produced by Gardner and O’Sullivan of this “sharpshooter” on July 5 or 6, 1863. At a time when a single photograph required time and expensive materials to produce, there must have been something about this particular body which captured the photographers’ attention. Notably, the man’s youthful features and the lack of gore on the body present a somewhat sanitized and romanticized version of death at Gettysburg.

William A. Frassanito, Early Photography at Gettysburg (Gettysburg: Thomas Publications, 1995), 268-278.



 
Confederate “Sharpshooter” in Original Location near Devil’s Den
A dead Confederate soldier lies amidst debris near Devil’s Den, with a gun and hat near his head. The rock formations near Devil’s Den remain unchanged in a modern photo of this location.
A dead Confederate soldier lies amidst debris near Devil’s Den, with a gun and hat near his head. Library of Congress.
The rock formations near Devil’s Den remain unchanged in a modern photo of this location. NPS Photo.
This photograph, taken by Alexander Gardner's assistant Timothy O'Sullivan, depicts a dead Confederate soldier at the likely location of his death on the western side of Devil’s Den. The body of this soldier would be moved by the photographers from this location to another one some 70 yards away, where he would become the subject of one of Gettysburg’s most indelible images.

William A. Frassanito, Early Photography at Gettysburg (Gettysburg: Thomas Publications, 1995), 268-278.



 
“Home of a Rebel Sharpshooter”
A dead Confederate soldier lies behind a stone fortification, a gun propped against the rocks next to him. The same location today shows little change.
A dead Confederate soldier lies behind a stone fortification, a gun propped against the rocks next to him. Library of Congress.
The same location today shows little change. NPS Photo.
Originally produced in Gardner’s Photographic Sketchbook of the War, this photograph has become one of the most recognizable images of the Civil War. While the gun propped against the rock would almost certainly not have been used by a sharpshooter, nor is it likely that the soldier fell in this location, this photograph nevertheless presents a powerful narrative of the struggle in and around Devil’s Den on July 2, 1863.

William A. Frassanito, Early Photography at Gettysburg (Gettysburg: Thomas Publications, 1995), 268-278.



 
Staged Photo at Devil's Den
Historic view of the boulders of Devil's Den also shows the western slope of Little Round Top in the distance to the right. Modern view of the boulders of Devil's Den also shows the western slope of Little Round Top in the distance to the right.
This view of Devil's Den also shows the western slope of Little Round Top in the distance to the right. Library of Congress.
This modern view of Devil's Den also shows the western slope of Little Round Top in the distance to the right. NPS Photo.
This view of the boulders of Devil's Den shows the western slope of Little Round Top in the distance to the right. This staged photograph was taken more than four months after the battle, by Peter Weaver, on November 11, 1863 and depicts "dead Confederates" strewn among the rocks of Devil's Den.

William A. Frassanito, Early Photography at Gettysburg (Gettysburg: Thomas Publications, 1995), 294-306.



 

Rose Woods

 
Confederate Dead near the Edge of the Rose Woods, Gardner Stereo #257
This view looks southwest, away from the Rose Woods. Three dead soldiers lie next to a large rock. The distinguishing marks on the large rock are still visible today.
This view looks southwest, away from the Rose Woods. Three dead soldiers lie next to a large rock. Library of Congress.
The distinguishing marks on the large rock are still visible today. NPS Photo.
This photo was one of a series of well-known photographs taken by Timothy O’Sullivan and Alexander Gardner on July 5 or 6, 1863, near the edge of the Rose Woods. The dead soldier nearest to boulder is lying in a shallow grave.



 
Confederate Dead near the Edge of the Rose Woods, Gardner Stereo #235
A group of Confederate dead lie near the edge of the Rose Woods. A large split rock provides a reference point for the location of the original photograph.
A group of Confederate dead lie near the edge of the Rose Woods. Library of Congress.
A large split rock provides a reference point for the location of the original photograph. NPS Photo.
Another image from Gardner and O’Sullivan’s Rose Woods series, this photograph depicts a group of Confederate dead gathered for burial. These men were likely from either Georgia or South Carolina regiments, which fought in and around the Rose Woods on July 2, 1863.

William A. Frassanito, Early Photography at Gettysburg (Gettysburg: Thomas Publications, 1995), 319-325.



 
Confederate dead near the edge of the Rose Woods, Gardner Stereo #256
A row of dead bodies lay in an open field. A large boulder is in the lower left corner and small boulder is in the middle right. The open field today with the same two boulders.
A group of dead Confederate soldiers lay in a field near the Rose Woods. This view faces north. Library of Congress.
The boulder in the foreground and dome shaped boulder in the background provide a reference point for where the camera tripod stood in 1863. NPS Photo.
Another image from Gardner and O’Sullivan’s Rose Woods series. By comparing the bodies, one can see that the first Then & Now photograph of the same group was taken just a few steps northeast of this photo, facing west. The photographers’ darkroom wagon can be seen in the background of the original photo.



 

Little Round Top

 
Little and Big Round Top from the Valley of Death
The two hills at the southern end of the battlefield are visible: Little Round Top on the left and Big Round Top on the right. The two hills at the southern end of the battlefield are visible: Little Round Top on the left and Big Round Top on the right.
A photo of Little and Big Round Top, facing southeast. Photographer Matthew Brady can be seen leaning against a tree in the left foreground. Library of Congress.
From today’s viewpoint, not much has changed other than the amount of growth on and near the Round Tops. NPS Photo.
From this angle, it is easy to see why many soldiers called Little Round Top, ‘the mountain’. With its steep incline and rocky ground, one can only imagine how daunting it would be to try and ascend the slopes while under fire. On July 2, the Union army would gain the upper hand with their claim on this valuable piece of geography.



 
Summit of Little Round Top
A large boulder is on the left and a pine tree is on the right in this black and white photo taken from the summit of Little Round Top. A large boulder on the left overlooks the summit of Little Round Top.
Little Round Top was the scene of intense fighting on July 2, 1863. From its summit looking northward, one could see much of Gettysburg, including the Codori farm, Oak Hill, the Brian farm, the “Copse of Trees” and the Wheatfield Road. Many of these place Library of Congress.
A view from Little Round Top today. The Pennsylvania Memorial can be seen in the distance. NPS Photo.
Little Round Top was the scene of intense fighting on July 2, 1863. From its summit looking northward, one could see much of Gettysburg, including the Codori farm, Oak Hill, the Brian farm, the “Copse of Trees” and the Wheatfield Road. Many of these places can still be seen today from the same vantage point.



 
Fortifications on Little Round Top
A large rock wall was built by Union soldiers on July 2, 1863. A large rock wall was built by Union soldiers on July 2, 1863.
Natural and manmade fortifications built by Union troops on July 2, 1863 on the southern slope of Little Round Top. Library of Congress.
Three or four large boulders act as landmarks for the original photo. Although the area is heavily trod, remnants of the stone barricade can be seen to the right of the photo. NPS Photo.
Little Round Top was not only a valuable defense point because of its height, but also because of its natural geography. The ‘mountain’, as some soldiers called it, was littered with large boulders which provided Union soldiers shelter from Confederate bullets. The three large boulders in this photograph would have given protection to the soldiers taking aim from behind them. Temporary stone walls would have been easy to build with the vast number of rocks nearby. This scene was captured by Timothy O’Sullivan just days after the battle.



 
91ST PA MONUMENT – 50th Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg in July, 1913
A crowd of people pose for a picture in front of the 91st Pennsylvania monument on the summit of Little Round Top. The 91st Pennsylvania monument stands at the summit of Little Round Top.
Veterans and friends pose in front of the 91st Pennsylvania monument on Little Round Top. Fiftieth Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg report of the Pennsylvania Commission.
The monument as it stands today at the summit of Little Round Top. *NOTE: The asphalt plaza surrounding the 91st PA Monument was installed by the CCC in the 1930’s and subsequent work by the NPS built the base up to the bottom stone of the monument. NPS Photo.
Veterans of the 91st Pennsylvania infantry and friends pose for a photo in front of the regiment’s monument during the 50th Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg in July, 1913. Erected in 1889, the monument honors those from this regiment who fought and sacrificed their lives at Gettysburg. The regiment brought with it 258 men to the field—of those, 3 were killed and 16 were wounded.



 
BRIG. GEN. GOUVERNEUR K. WARREN monument – 50th Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg in July, 1913
A group of Civil War veterans visit the statue to General Gouverneur Kemble Warren at the summit of Little Round Top. The statue to General Gouverneur Kemble Warren stands at the summit of Little Round Top.
Veterans examine the monument to General Warren on the summit of Little Round Top. Behind them stands the monument to the 91st PA. American Press Association – Fiftieth Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg report of the Pennsylvania Commission.
General Warren stands unchanged over a century later. The 91st PA monument behind him acts as a reference point to help align the ‘Then’ photo to the ‘Now’ photo. NPS Photo.
General Gouverneur Kemble Warren was Chief Engineer of the Army of the Potomac at the Battle of Gettysburg. His monument stands on a large boulder at the summit of Little Round Top. Warren recognized how valuable Little Round Top was for the Union Army’s line on Cemetery Ridge, and discovering it unoccupied, directed Colonel Strong Vincent’s brigade to the hill’s defense followed later by General Stephen Weed’s brigade. Warren’s leadership in moving troops to this place proved critical for the Union army.



 

Trostle Farm

 
Trostle House with dead horses from Bigelow's Battery
A historic picture of the Trostle house, held up in the center of the modern version, shows numerous dead horses from Bigelow's Battery. The modern picture of the Trostle house is partially obscured by a large tree. The monument to Bigelow's Battery can be seen on a rock between the house and the road.
The historic picture of the Trostle house, held up in the center of the modern picture, shows numerous dead horses from Bigelow's Battery. Library of Congress.
The modern picture of the Trostle house is partially obscured by a large tree. The monument to Bigelow's Battery can be seen on a rock between the house and the road. NPS Photo.
The Trostle farm was the site of desperate fighting on the afternoon of July 2, 1863 as the men of the 9th Massachusetts (Bigelow’s) Battery made a couragious stand against overwhelming Confederate forces. In an attempt to stave off the advancing Confederates from Kershaw and Barksdale’s brigades, the men of Bigelow’s Battery fought desperately before they were overrun and forced to retreat to Cemetery Ridge. Their sacrifice provided valuable time for Union reinforcements to form along Cemetery Ridge and helped thwart the Confederate attack in this area. The dead horses that are visible in the yard of the Trostle house are all that was left of this courageous stand. The framework to the left of the house in the historic photograph is evidence of an 1863 addition.



 
TROSTLE BARN with Dead Horses from Bigelow’s battery
Dead horses scatter the ground in front of a large brick barn with single cannonball hole. The large red brick and white sided barn stands in a green field with a blue sky.
The carcasses of dead horses from Bigelow’s 9th Massachusetts Battery can be seen scattered across the yard of the Trostle farm. Library of Congress.
The only sign remaining from the battle is a large hole in the brick gable of the barn left by a cannonball. NPS Photo.
The scene in this series of photos shows the Trostle barn, made famous by the large cannonball hole in the brick facade. By comparing the two photos, one can see just how many dead horses littered the property where Bigelow’s 9th Massachusetts Battery was overrun by the 21st Mississippi Infantry. This photo was captured by Timothy O’Sullivan.



 

Buildings and Farms

 
McPherson Farm
Two men look over a field at a large stone barn, a wagon shed, and a house. A large stone barn sits in an open field.
Matthew Brady and his assistant look upon the McPherson farm buildings – July, 1863. Gettysburg National Military Park
The McPherson barn is the only remnant of the farm today. The home burned down in 1895 and the center wagon shed no longer stands. NPS Photo.
The Edward McPherson Farm, which lies west of town, was the scene of heavy fighting on the first day of battle, July 1, 1863. While Confederate General Henry Heth’s Division advanced towards Gettysburg against defending Union cavalry commanded by General John Buford, Union reinforcements from General John Reynolds’ First Corps arrived. The fields swarmed with soldiers of opposing forces and the McPherson barn quickly became a sanctuary for the wounded. When fighting ceased, the barn and home continued as a hospital, leaving the property uninhabitable for months. 



 
LUTHERAN Theological SEMINARY
A young man sits on a white fence looking up the hill at a large building with a white cupola. A red brick building with a white cupola stands in the distance at the top of a ridge.
A photographer’s assistant sits on a fence, looking up at the Lutheran Theological Seminary building. Library of Congress.
The seminary and the ground before it looks much like it did in 1863. A few additional buildings surround the seminary. NPS Photo.
Built in 1832, the Gettysburg Lutheran Theological Seminary was the first Lutheran seminary in the country. Students studied for the ministry and religious education and continues to operate today. The ridge where the seminary was built would be named Seminary Ridge and this prominent location would become the jumping off point for thousands of Confederate soldiers throughout the battle. This structure, Schmucker Hall, was used to house wounded from both armies during and after the Battle of Gettysburg.



 
EVERGREEN CEMETERY GATEHOUSE
A black and white picture is superimposed on a modern picture of a red brick building shaped like an arch with two cannons in front of the structure. A picture of a red brick building shaped like an arch with two cannons in front of the structure.
Despite heavy fighting in the area, the gatehouse suffered only moderate damage. Library of Congress.
Today, the gatehouse is largely the same as it was in 1863 with the exception of an addition on the right side of the building. NPS Photo.
The Evergreen Cemetery Gatehouse, built in 1855, stands at the summit of Cemetery Hill. The house was used to shelter wounded and suffered damage from the fighting that raged in front of it on the evening of July 2. On the night of July 1, Elizabeth Thorn, wife of then-absent cemetery caretaker Peter Thorn, served supper to General Sickles, General Slocum and General Howard. Photographer Matthew Brady photographed the gate house approximately two weeks after the battle.



 
HOME OF BASIL BIGGS & FAMILY
A black and white picture of a large african american family, a horse, a dog, and a house and barn. A stone house with white picket fence stands alongside a road.
Basil Biggs, his family, two horses and a dog can be seen standing on Taneytown Road in front of their home and barn. Adams County Historical Society.
The original Biggs home can still be seen standing along the Taneytown Road today. The barn is not original. NPS Photo.
Basil Biggs was a free African-American who made Gettysburg his home in 1858. With the approach of Confederate troops before the battle, Biggs, his wife Mary and their seven children, fled town. Biggs and his family returned soon after the battle ended and worked to repair damage to his property and that of John Fisher, whose farm on the Taneytwon Road would become Biggs’ home that fall. Biggs was hired to work in the exhumation of Union dead from battlefield graves for burial in the National Cemetery. He was paid $1.25 per body.



 
Meade's Headquarters: Lydia Leister House
An 1863 view of the Lydia Leister house is at the center of this then and now picture meld. This modern day picture shows the Lydia Leister house along the Taneytown Road.
The Lydia Leister house is where Union General George G. Meade made his headquarters during the Battle of Gettysburg. Library of Congress.
This modern day picture looks north along the Taneytown Road. The Lydia Leister house is obscured from view by a large tree. NPS Photo.
The Lydia Leister house is where Union General George G. Meade made his headquarters during the Battle of Gettysburg. Late in the evening of July 2, Meade held a council of war in this house to decide if the Union army should stay and hold their hard-fought high ground or abandon their position. The council of war decided to stay. Late in the afternoon of July 3, Confederate batteries concentrated their missiles on the center of Cemetery Ridge in an attempt to soften up the Union position. Unbeknownst to the Confederate artillerymen, their rounds overshot their intended targets and began to land around Meade’s headquarters causing substantial damage. Although the commanding general moved to a safer location, evidence of the bombardment is everywhere. The house and surrounding fences are all damaged and dead horses lay in various stages of rigormortis in the center of the Taneytown Road and in the yard of the house.



 

1913 REUNION - 50th ANNIVERSARY OF THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG

 
ANNIVERSARY ATTENDEES LOUNGE ON THE PENNSYLVANIA MEMORIAL STAIRS
A black and white picture of Civil War veterans sitting on the lower steps of the Pennsylvania Memorial. The lower steps of the Pennsylvania Memorial are visible in front of a green grass lawn.
Veterans and others can be seen lounging on the stairs and lower level of the Pennsylvania Memorial at the 50th Anniversary in 1913. International News Service – Fiftieth Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg report of the Pennsylania Commission.
The Pennsylvania Memorial on Cemetery Ridge sits unchanged, the only piece missing from the ‘Today’ photo being the mass of veterans. NPS Photo.
The Pennsylvania Memorial was dedicated in 1910 and stands 110 feet tall, making it the largest monument at Gettysburg. A spiral staircase inside the northwest column takes visitors to the top of the monument where a sweeping view of the battlefield can be seen. On the base and interior of the memorial are bronze tablets which list the regiments and batteries that fought at Gettysburg. There are also two statues on each side of the memorial—these include notable figures such as President Abraham Lincoln, Major General John F. Reynolds and Major General George G. Meade.



 
VETERAN AND BOY AT THE PENNSYLVANIA MEMORIAL
A Civil War veteran points to his name on a tablet on the Pennsylvania Memorial as a young boy looks on. The base of the Pennsylvania Memorial has metal tablets with the names of the soldiers who were at the Battle of Gettysburg.
A veteran, Francis A. Culin, sergeant of the 68th PA Infantry, Company F, points to his name on a tablet on the base of the Pennsylvania Memorial as a young boy looks on.
The thousands of names listed on the tablets around the base of the Pennsylvania Memorial can still be read very clearly today. NPS Photo.
This photograph from the 50th Anniversary in 1913 provides a closer look at the bronze tablets lining the base of the Pennsylvania Memorial. The veteran pointing to his name on one of the tablets is Francis A. Culin, a sergeant of the 68th PA Infantry, Company F. A boy, perhaps his grandson, poses in the photograph next to him. 



 
HIGH WATER MARK OF THE REBELLION monument
Civil War veterans gather around a large book shaped monument next to a grove of trees. A large book shaped monument stands next to a grove of trees.
Veterans gather around the High Water Mark monument. International News Service – Fiftieth Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg report of the Pennsylania Commission.
The High Water Mark monument pictured today. In the background are the monuments to the 72nd and 71st Pennsylvania infantry.. NPS Photo.
Dedicated in 1892, the High Water Mark of the Rebellion monument represents both the Union and Confederate units that took part in Pickett’s Charge on the third day of battle. It sits in front of the Copse of Trees on Cemetery Ridge.



 
VETERANS VISIT THE MONUMENT TO GENERAL GEORGE GORDON MEADE
Civil War veterans gather around the large equestrian statue of General George Gordon Meade. A large equestrian statue stands on a grass lawn in front of a grove of trees.
Veterans gather around the monument to General Meade on Cemetery Ridge. The Ziegler’s Grove observation tower can be seen in the distance. International News Service – Fiftieth Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg report of the Pennsylania Commission.
The Meade statue stands on Cemetery Ridge. The Ziegler’s Grove observation tower was taken down to make way for the Cyclorama building that opened in 1963. NPS Photo.
Major General George Gordon Meade sits astride his horse, Baldy, on Cemetery Ridge. He faces west towards Seminary Ridge, the main Confederate line during the battle. General Meade was appointed commander of the Union Army of the Potomac just three days before the Battle of Gettysburg, after the resignation of General Joseph Hooker.



 

1938 REUNION - 75th ANNIVERSARY OF THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG

 
VETERAN POINTS TO SCENE OF PICKETT’S CHARGE FROM THE POSITION OF CUSHING’S BATTERY
Four Civil War veterans sit at the base of a small monument as one of them points with his cane. A cannon sits in the background. A small monument and cannon sit close to each other.
Gathered at the monument to Battery A, 4th U.S. Artillery, a veteran from California points with his cane to the scene of Pickett’s Charge while three other veterans look on. The Last Reunion of the Blue and Gray by Paul L. Roy.
The monument to Battery A, 4th U.S. Artillery stands where the veterans gathered in 1938. NPS Photo.
Cushing’s Battery A, 4th U.S Artillery went into action at Gettysburg on July 2, 1863. Commanded by Lieutenant Alonzo Cushing, the battery was located in the Angle and was heavily engaged in the cannonade and repulse of Pickett’s Charge. The battery suffered heavy losses: all but one gun was disabled, all horses but three were killed or wounded, 1 officer and 31 men were wounded, and 1 officer and 5 men were killed. The officer killed was Lieutenant Cushing, shot through the head while firing one of the last rounds from the remaining gun.



 
VETERANS SHAKE HANDS Across the Stone WALL on cemetery ridge
A Confederate veteran and a Union veteran shake hands over a stone wall. Other veterans watch on. A stone wall with wooden fence toppers run down the center of the picture towards a small white barn. Two small monuments are in the distance on the right.
A Confederate veteran and a Union veteran shake hands over the stone wall on Cemetery Ridge. The top of the 1st Delaware infantry monument can be seen above the heads of the Union veterans on the right of the picture.  The Last Reunion of the Blue and Gray by Paul L. Roy.
The stone wall and the 1st Delaware monument act as reference points. Much is the same as 1938 with the exception of the partially collapsed stone wall and rehabilitated Brian farm buildings in the background. NPS Photo.
The 75th Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg was the last to host veterans of the Civil War. The theme of national unity was heavily promoted at both the 1938 and 1913 reunions—unity between the North and South and unity between friends who were once foes. In this photograph taken at the stone wall on Cemetery Ridge, a Confederate veteran can be seen greeting a Union veteran. These staged, yet moving, photos were a common occurrence at the battle anniversaries. The top of the 1st Delaware infantry monument can be seen above the heads of the Union veterans on the right of the picture. 



Last updated: August 13, 2019

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