2008 "From Shore to Sea" Archived Lecture Videos

January: Tom Kendrick, The Odyssey of a California Sea Urchin Diver

NOTE: This lecture was not recorded.

 
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Duration:
39 minutes, 37 seconds

During the February “From Shore to Sea” lecture historian Linda Bentz discussed her research of Chinese fishermen who harvested the seas around the Channel Islands in the 19th century and were among the earliest commercial fisherman in California.

 
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Duration:
1 hour, 17 minutes, 54 seconds

Scripps Institution of Oceanography researcher Dr. John Hildebrand talked about how acoustic monitoring can be used to study marine mammals and shipping noise around the Channel Islands at the March “From Shore to Sea” lecture.

 
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Duration:
1 hour, 9 minutes, 54 seconds

Two local marine experts, Gary Davis, retired National Park Service Chief Scientist for Ocean Programs, and Dr. Satie Airamé, University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) Marine Biologist, discussed the state of the seas at the Channel Islands during the April “From Shore to Sea” lecture.

 
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Duration:
55 minutes, 25 seconds

During the May “From Shore to Sea” lecture Channel Islands National Park marine biologist Dan Richards discussed his research on the black abalone—an important intertidal species that was once among the most abundant shellfish along the California coastline and today is struggling to survive.

 
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Duration:
1 hour, 8 minutes, 58 seconds

Brian Latta, Santa Cruz Predatory Bird Research Group (SCPBRG) biologist, discussed efforts to reestablish peregrine falcons to the California Channel Islands following their decline from the impacts of DDT at the June “From Shore to Sea” lecture.

 
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Duration:
49 minutes, 51 seconds

Jan Timbrook, the Curator of Ethnography at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History (SBMNH), portrayed some of the ways in which Chumash people have used plants for food, medicine, clothing, tools, utensils, and other essential items during the July “From Shore to Sea” lecture series.

 
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Duration:
53 minutes

The August “From Shore to Sea” lectures featured Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History Vertebrate Zoologists Paul Collins and Michelle Berman and their investigations of several blue whale deaths caused by ship strikes that occurred off the Channel Islands in the fall of 2007.

 
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Duration:
46 minutes, 53 seconds

The September “From Shore to Sea” lectures featured Alan Salazar discussing the importance of the tomol, a traditional plank canoe used historically by the Chumash for fishing and travel between the islands and mainland for trade. The tomol connected Chumash communities and continues to be significant to their culture.

 
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Duration:
46 minutes, 38 seconds

During the October “From Shore to Sea” lecture, Ian Taniguchi, a senior biologist with California Department of Fish and Game, spoke about abalone recovery following an over 10-year closure of this fishery in southern California. He described the State plans for abalone recovery including consideration of a possible limited fishery for red abalone at San Miguel Island.

 
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Duration:
40 minutes, 42 seconds

During the November “From Shore to Sea” lecture, Greg Sanders, a senior biologist with Minerals Management Service, offered a history of sea otters along the California coast including their near extinction, current threats, and recovery efforts.

 
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Duration:
34 minutes, 14 seconds

During the December “From Shore to Sea” lecture, Ann Huston, the Chief of Cultural Resources with Channel Islands National Park, discussed the ranching operations on Santa Cruz Island during the late 1800’s and early 1900s.

Last updated: June 4, 2016

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