Superintendent's Compendium

Compendium of Designations, Closures, Request Requirements, and Other Restrictions Imposed Under the Discretionary Authority of the Superintendent

Signed: William L. Cox, Superintendent, May 14, 2015. Signature on file.

In accordance with regulations and the delegated authority provided in Title 36, Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter I, Parts 1 through 7, authorized by Title 16, United States Code, the following regulatory provisions are established for the proper management, protection, government and public use of the portion of Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service.

These discretionary regulations are in addition to the other regulations published in Title 36, CFR, Chapter I, Parts 1 through 7. Unless otherwise stated, these regulatory provisions apply in addition to the requirements contained in Title 36, CFR, Chapter I.

 
 

§1.4 Definitions

The term “park” means the waters of the Chattahoochee River, to the maximum extent of the high water mark (“bank-to-bank”), from Buford Dam to its confluence with Peachtree Creek and the land along it as defined in the park’s enabling legislation with revisions as indicated on authorized land maps.

The term "unmanned aircraft" means a device that is used or intended to be used for flight in the air without the possibility of direct human intervention from within or on the device, and the associated operational elements and components that are required for the pilot or system operator in command to operate or control the device (such as cameras, sensors, communication links). This term includes all types of devices that meet this definition (e.g., model airplanes, quadcopters, drones) that are used for any purpose, including for recreation or commerce.

§1.5 Visiting Hours, Public Use Limits and Closures

(a)(1) Park Hours - The park is closed to all visitor use during the hours of darkness, except under conditions of a permit issued by the Superintendent. Darkness is defined as thirty (30) minutes after local sunset to thirty (30) minutes before local sunrise. Park lands behind automatic gates open to vehicle entry at 6:30 am and close to vehicle entry at 6:30 pm during standard time and 8:30 pm during daylight savings time.

(a)(1) Motorized Vessels Closure - The following park waters are closed to motorized vessels, all year:

  • Island Ford Pond
  • Sibley Pond

A vessel with a motor is considered in compliance with the closure if the motor is removed from the transom, or other attachment point from which it is operated, and placed in the bottom or on the deck of the vessel.

(a)(1) Golf Equipment Closure - The park is closed to the use of golf equipment including golf balls. The use of golf carts may be authorized with the approval of the Superintendent.

(a)(1) Glass Containers Closure - The Chattahoochee River from bank to bank is closed to the possession of all glass containers.

(a)(1) Unmanned Aircraft, Rockets, Vessels and Vehicles Closure – The park, including airspace, is closed to the launching, landing, or operating of unmanned aircraft, rockets, vessels, vehicles or similar propelled devices. Launching, landing, or operating an unmanned aircraft, rocket, vessel, vehicle or similar propelled device from or on lands and waters administered by the National Park Service within the boundaries of Chattahoochee River NRA is prohibited except as approved in writing by the superintendent.

(a)(1) Trail Games Closure - The park is closed to the playing of hash house harrier games. The painting, flagging, or dropping of materials for the use of marking a trail or path is prohibited.

(a)(1) Geocaching Closure - The park is closed to the establishment of geocaches.

(a)(1) Area Closures – Entering an area posted closed with an Area Closed sign is prohibited.

(a)(1) Akers Mill Administrative Area Closure - The Akers Mill Administrative area is closed to public use. Non-employees doing business with the park may enter and remain in these areas when invited and escorted by park staff. Delivery company personnel may enter these areas when making deliveries or pick-ups. The following areas are closed:

  • Dispatch office building and grounds, bally building, equipment shed, fenced compound, horse barn, dog kennel and administrative access roadway.

(a)(1) Island Ford Administrative Areas Closure – The Island Ford Administrative areas are closed to public use. Non-employees doing business with the park may enter and remain in these areas when invited and escorted by park staff. Delivery company personnel may enter these areas when making deliveries or pick-ups. The following areas are closed:

  • Maintenance – Interior shop areas, deck, bally building, equipment shed, storage pavilion, fenced compound, employee parking area and three administrative access roadways.

  • Quarters – Interior house areas, yard, trail and administrative roadway access.
  • Operations – Interior building areas, official vehicle parking area, deck, walkways and administrative access roadway.
  • Hewlett Lodge – Interior Lodge areas with the exception of the lobby and visitor center area that are open to the public. The walkways between the front entrance and rear center entrance on the North side of the Lodge are closed.
  • Metal Storage Building (adjacent to the lodge) – Interior building areas, walkways and administrative access roadway.

(a)(1) Settles Bridge and Jones Bridge Closure – The bridges at Settles Bridge and Jones Bridge are closed to public use.

(a)(1) Restroom Pipe and Maintenance Chases Closure – All restroom pipe and maintenance chases are closed to public use.

(a)(2) Motorized Wheelchairs and Personal Transporters - Motorized wheelchairs and gyroscopically stabilized battery-powered personal transporters are allowed on trails when used by persons with mobility disabilities.

(a)(2) Personal Flotation Devices – A wearable personal flotation device (PFD) must be worn at all times by each person boating, tubing, or wading in Chattahoochee River waters between 1) Buford Dam and the Highway 20 bridge and 2) Morgan Falls Dam and the Morgan Falls boat ramp. Children under the age of 13 must wear a PFD when aboard a vessel that is under way in the Chattahoochee River or ponds, unless the child is within a fully enclosed cabin. On all other river sections in the park, a PFD is required for each person aboard a vessel or tube in the Chattahoochee River or ponds and highly recommended that it be worn. PFDs must be:

  • Readily accessible to all occupants when not worn.

  • In good and serviceable condition.
  • Legibly marked with the US Coast Guard approved number.
  • Appropriately sized for the occupants.

(a)(2) Park Passes - Drivers of vehicles that park in designated parking lots identified by entrance fee signs are required to purchase and properly display a daily or annual park pass. Daily park passes are transferable between vehicles of the same household; however, a separate park pass must be displayed for each parked vehicle. The daily and annual park pass must be displayed hung from the rear view mirror facing the windshield or taped to the inside of the windshield. An annual park pass internet sales receipt is valid for 10 days when displayed on the dash of the vehicle. Other annual park pass receipts are not sufficient and do not satisfy the display requirement of this section.

(a)(2) Special Use Permit Limits - Special Use Permits may be issued no earlier than one hundred twenty (120) days prior to the start of the permit. No one organization or group may reserve the same area more than three (3) consecutive weekends or nine consecutive days in any thirty (30) day period.

(a)(2) River Watercraft Access - All vessels; including tubes, rafts, canoes, kayaks, paddleboards; may only access the river at public access launch ramps. These ramps are located at:

  • Bowmans Island (ACE)

  • Settles Bridge (NPS)
  • Chattahoochee Pointe (Forsyth)
  • McGinnis Ferry (GADOT)
  • Rogers Bridge Park (Duluth)
  • Abbotts Bridge (NPS)
  • Medlock Bridge (NPS)
  • Jones Bridge (NPS & Gwinnett)
  • Garrard Landing (Roswell)
  • Island Ford (NPS)
  • Don White Park (Roswell)
  • Riverside Park (Roswell)
  • Chattahoochee River Park (Roswell)
  • Chattahoochee Nature Center (Roswell)
  • Morgan Falls Overlook Park (Sandy Springs)
  • Morgan Falls Park (GADNR)
  • Johnson Ferry (NPS)
  • Powers Island (NPS)
  • Paces Mill (NPS)

§1.6 Permits

(f) The following activities require a permit:

  • Weapons, traps and nets – 2.4(d)

  • Research specimens – 2.5(a)
  • Camping and food storage – 2.10(a)
  • Audio disturbances – 2.12(a)(2), (3) & (4)
  • Aircraft and air delivery – 2.17(c)(1)
  • Recreation Fees – 2.23(b)
  • Explosives – 2.38(a) & (b)
  • Special events – 2.50(a)
  • Public assemblies, meetings – 2.51(a)
  • Sale or distribution of printed matter – 2.52(a)
  • Livestock use and agriculture – 2.60(b)
  • Residing on federal land – 2.61(a)
  • Memorialization – 2.62(b)
  • [Vehicle] Load, weight and size limits – 4.11(a)
  • Business operations – 5.3
  • Commercial photography – 5.5(a) & (b)
  • Commercial vehicles – 5.6(c)
  • Construction of buildings or other facilities – 5.7
 

§2.1 Preservation of Natural, Cultural and Archeological Resources

(c)(1) All native and non-native fruits, berries and nuts may be collected for personal use or consumption.

(c)(2)(i) Gathering of native and non-native fruits, berries and nuts are limited to one (1) quart per person per day.

(c)(2)(ii) The use of ladders or climbing of vegetation is prohibited while gathering native and non-native fruits, berries and nuts. All collections must be accomplished while within reach of the ground.

§2.2 Wildlife Protection

(d) It is prohibited to transport lawfully or unlawfully taken wildlife with the exception of lawfully taken fish and as outlined below.
(d) Lawfully taken wildlife outside of the park that escapes in to the park may be pursued and retrieved only when first receiving permission from the park communications center. Persons pursuing or retrieving lawfully taken wildlife may not bring weapons as defined in 36 CFR in to the park.
(d) Lawfully taken wildlife may be transported on state and county roadways without obtaining permission or a permit from the Superintendent.
(e) The park is closed to the viewing of wildlife with an artificial light.

§2.4 Weapons, Traps and Nets

(d) Authorized armored car company officers in the performance of their official duties and in possession of their official company credentials may carry or possess a weapon in a Federal building otherwise marked Firearms Prohibited without obtaining a permit from the Superintendent.

§2.10 Camping and Food Storage

(a) A permit is required from the Superintendent in order to camp overnight.

§2.13 Fires

(a)(1) Fires may be lighted and maintained without obtaining a permit from the Superintendent when the fire is contained in a grill or other suitable container designated for such use.
(b) Fires shall be extinguished upon termination of use to the extent that no hot coals, ash or burnt materials remain. Cold coals, ash and burnt materials shall be deposited in metal trash receptacles or removed from the park.

§2.14 Sanitation and Refuse

(a)(8) In developed and front country areas, human body waste may only be disposed of in restroom toilet and urinal fixtures designed for that purpose.

§2.15 Pets

(a)(5) Individuals in possession of pets must have on their person a bag or device for the containerization and removal of pet excrement. Individuals shall immediately containerize and dispose of excrement deposited by their pet in a trash receptacle or remove it from the park. This section shall not apply to individuals in possession of horses utilizing designated equestrian trails.
(e) Pets may not be kept by park residents unless written approval is obtained from the Superintendent.

§2.16 Horses and Pack Animals

(b) Horses are only permitted on the designated equestrian trails located on the Forsyth County side of Bowman’s Island.

§2.21 Smoking

(a) Smoking is prohibited in the interior of all government structures, within twenty-five feet of all government structures, and while in government vehicles and vessels.

§2.51 Public Assemblies

(e) Locations are designated in Appendix A.

§2.52 Sale or Distribution of Printed Matter

(e) Locations are designated in Appendix A.

§4.11 Load, Weight and Size Limits

(a) A permit is required from the Superintendent in order to operate a vehicle exceeding designated load, weight and size limits. Vehicles exceeding designated load, weight and size limits that are operating on state and county roadways may do so without obtaining a permit from the Superintendent.

§4.21 Speed Limits

(b) The following maximum speed limits are designated for the following roads and trails:

Twenty-five (25) miles per hour:

  • Island Ford Parkway - from the main gate through the last curve prior to the Headquarters building
  • Jones Bridge Access Road
Twenty (20) miles per hour:
  • Island Ford Parkway - from the end of the road at the Headquarters building to the start of the first curve on the inbound lane
Fifteen (15) miles per hour:
  • Palisades Access Roads
  • Paces Mill
  • Akers Mill
  • Whitewater Creek
  • Indian Trail
  • Cochran Shoals Access Roads
  • Powers Island
  • Interstate North
  • Columns
  • Sope Creek
  • Johnson Ferry Access Roads
  • South
  • North
  • Gold Branch Access Road
  • Vickery Creek Access Roads
  • Allenbrook
  • Riverside
  • Hewlett Field Access Road
  • Chattahoochee River Environmental Education Center (CREEC) Access Road
  • Medlock Bridge Access Road
  • Abbotts Bridge Access Road
  • McGinnis Ferry Access Road
  • Settles Bridge Access Road
  • Bowmans Island Access Road
Ten (10) miles per hour:
  • For bicycles, motorized wheelchairs, and gyroscopically stabilized battery-powered personal transporters on unpaved roads closed to public vehicle traffic and trails that are identified with posted bicycle permitted symbolic signs located in the following areas:
    • Cochran Shoals
  • For bicycles, motorized wheelchairs, and gyroscopically stabilized battery-powered personal transporters on surfaced multi-use trails that are identified with posted bicycle permitted symbolic signs located in the following areas:
    • Vickery Creek Ivy Mill Riverside trail
    • Palisades Rottenwood Creek trail located along Rottenwood Creek and the Chattahoochee River
Five (5) miles per hour:
  • For motorized wheelchairs and gyroscopically stabilized battery-powered personal transporters used by mobility-impaired persons on any other paved or unpaved trails not otherwise identified in this section.

§4.30 Bicycles

(a) Bicycles are allowed on all paved and unpaved roads and parking areas open to public vehicle traffic.
(a) Bicycles are allowed on unpaved roads closed to public vehicle traffic and trails that are identified with posted bicycle permitted symbolic signs and located in the following areas:

  • Cochran Shoals

These bicycle routes located within Cochran Shoals are identified on a map in Appendix B.
(a) Bicycles are allowed on the following surfaced multi-use trails:

  • Vickery Creek Riverside trail located adjacent to Ivy Mill
  • Palisades Rottenwood Creek trail located along Rottenwood Creek and the Chattahoochee River

(a) All other unpaved park roads closed to public vehicle traffic are closed to bicycles.
(a) Bicycle users must follow the directional one-way signs on the Cochran Shoals multi-use trails.
(a) Bicycle users must yield to pedestrians when encountered on multi-use trails.

 

Justifications for Compendium Actions

1.5 Visiting Hours, Public Use Limits and Closures

(a)(1) Park Hours - Nighttime water fluctuations due to dam releases and cold water temperatures make nighttime navigation on the river difficult and hazardous. The inability to distinguish passages through rocky shoals and judge the rise of the river in the dark increases the chance of injury and death. Unrestricted access at night would allow travel by people unfamiliar with and/or without a sufficient level of proficiency access to negotiate the Chattahoochee River.

The park is a daytime use area with little legitimate nighttime use and no camping allowed. Cliffs and steep terrain are difficult to distinguish at night and possess a serious hazard of injury and death.

The close proximity of the park to the metropolitan Atlanta area makes it susceptible to activity such as vandalism, theft, unauthorized fires, abuse of alcohol and drugs, underage incidents and confrontations that occur because of these activities. Signing, education, and enforcement by park rangers and other agencies have not been effective in preventing illegal activities. Automatic gates permit park lands to be closed and opened to vehicles without the need for park rangers to be present.

(a)(1) Motorized Vessels - Island Ford and Sibley Ponds are small ponds and are used for environmental education and children’s fishing programs. The size of the ponds and shallow areas in each make them more conducive to rowing than the use of motors. Motors would leave fuel and oil residue in the small ponds polluting the waters. These tranquil locations offer an opportunity to teach children in a natural setting free of the noise and disturbance that a motorized vessel would bring.

(a)(1) Golfing Equipment - Although the park is a national recreation area, not all recreational uses are compatible. The use of golf equipment, specifically using open areas in the park for driving golf balls produces several problems. Lost golf balls produce litter in the natural environment. Driven balls fly a great distance, so one person may, by virtue of the potential injury from being struck, exclude other visitors from the use of an entire open field. The divots created in the grass from swinging clubs would, in sufficient quantity, cause bare areas and erosion problems.

(a)(1) Glass Containers - Glass containers broken while picnicking or boating or when left behind as trash create a significant safety hazard. Glass in the river is difficult to see even in clear water, decomposes at an extremely slow rate and remains a hazard for a long period of time. Hands and feet become cut and boats and rafts are damaged from broken glass.

(a)(1) Unmanned Aircraft, Rockets, Vessels, and Vehicles - Unmanned aircraft are usually propelled by small gasoline or electric driven engines. They are usually remote controlled but the operator does not have complete control over the craft due to winds or operator error. There is potential injury to bystanders, visitors, wildlife and vegetation from being struck by a fast moving aircraft. The use of aircraft may exclude other visitors from the use of an entire open field. The small engines are noisy and produce exhaust into the air, which affects the quality visit of other park visitors. Wildlife are often disturbed due to the noise associated with these types of devices. Reasons include the maintenance of public health and safety, protection of environmental or scenic values, protection of natural or cultural resources, implementation of management responsibilities, equitable allocation and use of facilities, or the avoidance of conflict among visitor use activities.

NPS Management Policies section 1.5 requires caution when a park is confronted with a new park use such as unmanned aircraft. The closure is a necessary, interim measure until the NPS considers how to address this new use on a long term basis and that allowing the use of unmanned aircraft before the park has properly evaluated whether this use is appropriate could result in unacceptable impacts to park resources, park values, and visitor safety.

Model rockets are usually propelled by small chemical driven engines. They are usually not controlled by the operator. There is potential injury to bystanders, visitors, wildlife and vegetation from being struck by a fast moving rocket. The use of rockets may exclude other visitors from the use of an entire open field. The small engines are noisy and produce exhaust into the air, which affects the quality visit of other park visitors. Wildlife are often disturbed due to the noise associated with these types of devices.

Model vessels are usually propelled by small gasoline or electric driven engines. They are usually remote controlled but the operator does not have complete control over the craft due to currents or operator error. The small engines are noisy, leave gasoline and oil residue in the water, which affects the quality visit of other park visitors. Wildlife are often disturbed due to the noise associated with these types of devices.

Model vehicles tend to need a lot of open space, such as a parking lot, to operate. Usage in a parking lot presents a safety hazard to bystanders and traffic alike. There are no acceptable locations in the park for a visitor to use a remote control vehicle in a safe and enjoyable manner. Wildlife can be disturbed due to the noise and movement associated with these types of devices.

(a)(1) Trail Games - Often this game involves running along a route that is marked by an advanced runner often at night. These markers are usually called “Hashes”. Runners chase the person marking the route who is usually called the “Hare”. The “Hare” drops flour or other material to mark the route. The marking material is not readily identifiable and causes concern to both visitors and park staff. This game encourages players to move off trail that leads to vegetative damage and erosion problems. Organizers of this type of activity are known to hold events in the park without prior approval or any attempt to obtain a Special Use Permit.

(a)(1) Geocaching Games - Geocaches typically are hidden in natural areas, archeological sites or in man made features. The object of this game is to locate well-hidden caches of materials stored in a container that may be buried. This game encourages participants to move off trail that leads to vegetative damage and erosion problems. Digging disturbs park resources and damages archeological sites. Sometimes cache containers are labeled as hazardous, radioactive, corrosive or explosive leading to misidentification by bystanders and first responders. This activity can be alarming to bystanders who misidentify the individuals when they observe participants hiding or acting in a suspicious manner to avoid detection. Organizers of this type of activity are known to hold events in the park without prior approval or any attempt to obtain a Special Use Permit.

(a)(1) Closures – Some areas of the park are closed periodically for public safety, resource management and maintenance reasons. These closures are to safeguard the public from hazards, prevent resource damage and to perform maintenance activities.

(a)(1) Akers Mill Administrative Area Closure - The Akers Mill Administrative area has no public facilities. This area is used to store government materials and equipment that need to be safeguarded from tampering and theft.

(a)(1) Island Ford Administrative Areas Closure – The Island Ford Administrative areas have no public facilities. These areas are used to store government materials and equipment that need to be safeguarded from tampering and theft. Residents of the living quarters deserve privacy in and around their quarters.

(a)(1) Settles Bridge and Jones Bridge Closure - The bridges at Settles Bridge and Jones Bridge are deteriorated bridges that are not maintained. The bridges are closed to all use in order to maintain public safety.

(a)(1) Restroom Pipe and Maintenance Chases Closure – All restroom pipe and maintenance chases have no public facilities. These areas are used to store government materials and equipment that need to be safeguarded from tampering and theft.

(a)(2) Motorized Wheelchairs and Personal Transporters - 36 CFR Section 1.4 excludes motorized wheelchairs from the definition of motorized vehicle, and separately defines motorized wheelchair as: a self-propelled wheeled device, designed solely for and used by a mobility-impaired person for locomotion that is both capable of and suitable for use in indoor pedestrian areas. 36 CFR Section 1.2 (e) states that the regulations in this chapter are intended to treat a mobility-impaired person using a manual or motorized wheelchair as a pedestrian, and are not intended to restrict the activities of such a person beyond the degree that the activities of a pedestrian are restricted by the same regulations.

Personal transporters are defined as a two-wheeled gyroscopically stabilized battery-powered personal transportation device like a segway. While a personal transporter is not designed solely for mobility-impaired persons, some individuals with disabilities use this device as their means of personal mobility in lieu of more traditional devices like the wheelchair. The NPS motorized vehicle exception that is already provided for motorized wheelchairs is extended to include personal transporters when used by an individual with a disability as his or her chosen means of mobility.

In order to provide the greatest park access possible for individuals with a disability, it is appropriate to allow motorized wheelchairs and personal transporters on park trails when used by an individual with a disability.

(a) Personal Flotation Devices – The wearing of personal flotation devices (PFD) saves lives. The Chattahoochee River between 1) Buford Dam and the Highway 20 bridge and 2) Morgan Falls Dam and the Morgan Falls boat ramp are listed as “hazardous waters” by the Georgia DNR. The river water level in this area rises rapidly with strong currents and water temperatures in the low 50° Fahrenheit range due to the proximity to Buford Dam. River users become stranded regularly in the river and drownings have occurred. Children under age 10 must wear a PFD when a vessel is under way anywhere on the Chattahoochee River for improved safety. The water temperature remains cold in the Chattahoochee River with sometimes strong currents below Highway 20 and the wearing of a PFD is highly recommended.

(a)(2) Park Passes - Daily and Annual Park Passes must be properly displayed to ensure compliance with this regulation. This is the only fair way to enforce the payment of park fees. Park passes must be placed in the interior of the vehicle to prevent theft. An annual park pass internet sales receipt is valid for 10 days since the actual park pass must be mailed to the purchaser. The annual park pass receipt carries no value and thus does not satisfy the display requirement of this section.

(a)(2) Special Use Permit Limits – Without this rule, some groups would reserve areas up to a year in advance for their exclusive use preventing other groups and individuals from having the opportunity to use park lands. The one hundred twenty (120) day limit on issuing permits ensures that areas are not reserved so far in advance to preclude use to others. The three (3) consecutive weekends or nine consecutive days in any thirty (30) day period limit on reserving the same area allows the land to rest to prevent overuse, damage to the resources and erosion.

(a)(2) Launching and retrieving any type of watercraft from the river bank at areas without a launch ramp will cause river and stream bank disturbance. This disturbance is in violation of the 50’ undisturbed natural vegetative buffer established by the 1973 Metropolitan River Protection Act.

§1.6 Permits

The permits listed are required to implement closures, restriction and designations made in Title 36, CFR, Chapter I and this compendium. Without the permits, the Superintendent would have a series of discretionary closures, restrictions and designations. The permits allow an orderly system of visitor use management.

§2.1 Preservation of Natural, Cultural and Archeological Resources

(c)(1) The harvest of small quantities of fruits, nuts and berries has not been a problem in the park from the standpoint of resource preservation.

(c)(2)(i) The failure to establish a limit on the volume that may be collected each day could result in resource damage. The limit is set to minimize the possibility of harvest of resources in commercial quantity.

(c)(2)(ii) The restriction on gathering from or within reach of the ground prevents damage to resources from individuals climbing vegetation or the use of ladders. This restriction also increases safety and eliminates the chance of a person falling and receiving an injury.

§2.2 Wildlife Protection

(d) Preventing taken wildlife from being transported through the park reduces the chance that the animal was poached from the park. Subjecting drivers of vehicles operating on state and county roadways that pass through the park to this rule is unreasonable and not practical.

(e) Wildlife in the park are protected from harassment including the use of artificial lights for viewing. The park land is essentially islands in an urban area. In some cases, the park is the only place for wildlife to escape to a natural setting where they should be free from human interference.

§2.4 Weapons, Traps and Nets

(d) It is unreasonable to expect authorized armored car company officers in the performance of their official duties to obtain a permit from the Superintendent in order to carry their weapon while in performance of their official duties.

§2.10 Camping and Food

(a) The park has no facilities for organized camping. The park land is small in size, and in close proximity to urban development, so primitive camping is not practical. Serious resource impacts would be expected from a large number of persons camping. Camping may be allowed in infrequent instances by permit from the Superintendent when camping has a direct association with the purpose of the park visit and the group size is such that impact on resources are kept to a minimum.

§2.13 Fires

(a)(1) Restricting the use of fires to grills or other appropriate containers will minimize the chance of human-caused wildfires, possible damage to adjacent private property, and degradation of park resources.

(b) Ensuring that no hot coals, ash or burnt material remain after a fire will minimize the chance of human-caused wildfires, possible damage to adjacent private property, and degradation of park resources. The requirement to deposit coals, ash and burn material in metal trash receptacles or removed from the park further reduces the chance of a re-ignition and keeps visitor use areas clean.

§2.14 Sanitation and Refuse

(a)(8) Requiring that human body waste be disposed in appropriate restroom fixtures in developed and front country areas protects public health and safety and park resources by preventing further bacterial contamination from runoff into the Chattahoochee River.

§2.15 Pets

(a)(5) The proper disposal of pet excrement protects public health and safety, helps control the spread of disease, avoids degradation of the visitor experience from the sight and smell or fecal material and reduces bacterial contamination from runoff into the Chattahoochee River.

(e) It is impractical to allow park residents to keep pets. Park housing is in a dormitory style with areas being shared by multiple occupants. Pets often cause odor and cleaning problems and some occupants may be allergic to pets.

§2.16 Horses and Pack Animals

(b) The use of horses is not practical in most areas of the park due to trails designed for walkers and steep sections causing erosion problems. The Cochran Shoals trail is particularly fragile due to the trail surface being a compacted smooth gravel/sand mixture that is susceptible to damage from the hooves of horses. The irregular surface that would be created by horse use would destroy its value for jogging, walking and bicycling and promote erosion. The additional problems of manure on the trails would adversely affect the visitor experience.

§2.21 Smoking

(a) Smoking is prohibited to ensure a healthy workplace for employees and visitors.

§4.11 Load, Weight and Size Limits

(a) A permit is required of vehicles exceeding designated load, weight and size limits in order to protect park roadways from excessive wear and tear and damage. The park roads are relatively narrow and winding with limited forward visibility. Larger and overweight vehicles pose a significant safety hazard to other vehicle, bicycle and pedestrian traffic. Subjecting drivers of vehicles operating on state and county roadways that pass through the park to this rule is unreasonable and not practical.

§4.21 Speed Limits

(b) Speed limits on park roads need to be reduced from those stated in 36 CFR 4.21(a) for public safety. The park roads are relatively narrow and winding with limited forward visibility. The speeds identified are appropriate for the construction of the roads and the amount of pedestrian and bicycle activity that takes place on, along, and across the roads.
The speed of bicycles, motorized wheelchairs, and personal transporters is limited for the safety of the rider as well as pedestrians sharing the roads and trails. Maneuverability is necessary in order to avoid collisions and conflicts with other visitors.

§4.30 Bicycles

Bicycles are allowed on the unpaved roads closed to public vehicle traffic located within Cochran Shoals because resource damage and conflicts with other visitor uses are minimal. These roadways are wider than a normal foot trail and permit multiple uses with minimal conflict.

Bicycles are allowed on trails that have been designed specifically for multi-use including bicycles. These routes have been evaluated under the National Environmental Policy Act, found to be consistent with the protection of park resources and will not disturb park wildlife. This use is in keeping with the park’s national recreation area status. Other areas of the park with unpaved roads closed to public vehicle traffic and trails are not suitable for bicycle use.

Bicycle use is alternated by day using signs posted at multi-use trail intersections identifying the direction of travel each day of the week. This permits pedestrians the choice of walking in the opposite direction so they meet bicyclists face-to-face for improved safety. This also helps to even the wear of the unpaved dirt multi-use trails so they will be more sustainable and require less maintenance.

Safety of bicyclists and pedestrians is of the utmost importance when using multi-use trails together. Sometimes bicycle users unintentionally frighten pedestrians and pets especially when moving on sometimes narrow winding dirt trails. The safest method of bicycles and pedestrians passing each other is when the bicyclist yield to pedestrians.

 

Appendix A

Locations Designated for §2.51 Public Assemblies and §2.52 Sale or Distribution of Printed Matter

Palisades at Paces Mill
The grass north of the entrance road at the southwest corner of the first paved parking section. Starting at the first parking space an area 20’ by 40’.
Palisades at Akers Mill
The gravel west of the entrance road at the northwest corner of the parking lot. Starting at the first parking space an area 20’ by 40’.
Palisades at Whitewater Creek
The grass along the wood line at the southwest corner of the parking lot and south of the access gate. Starting at the fence an area 20’ by 40’.
Palisades at Indian Trail
The gravel north of the entrance road at the north corner of the parking lot. Starting at the first parking space an area 20’ by 40’.
Cochran Shoals at Powers Island
The grass along the wood line west of the entrance road and southeast of the vehicle turnaround. Starting 20’ from the entrance road and area 20’ x 60’.
Cochran Shoals at Interstate North
The pavement west of the entrance road at the southeast corner of the parking lot. Starting at the first parking space an area 20’ by 60’.
Cochran Shoals at Columns
The pavement southeast of the entrance road at the east corner of the parking lot. Starting at the first parking space an area 20’ by 40’.
Cochran Shoals at Sope Creek
The pavement south of the entrance road at the southwest corner of the parking lot. Starting at the first parking space an area 20’ by 40’.
Johnson Ferry South
The grass along the wood line to the east of the parking lot and southeast of the access gate. Starting at the fence an area 20’ by 40’.
Johnson Ferry North
The pavement at the northwest end of the parking lot. Starting at the first parking space an area 20’ by 60’.
Gold Branch
The grass along the wood line to the west of the parking lot and northwest of the access gate. Starting at the fence an area 20’ by 40’.
Vickery Creek at Allenbrook
The grass along the wood line southwest of the entrance road at the southeast corner of the parking lot. Starting 10’ from the parking lot an area 20’ by 40’.
Island Ford
The grass along the wood line on the north side of Island Ford Parkway, east of the maintenance facility entrance road and west of the pond. Starting 10’ from the entrance road an area 20’ by 60’.
Holcomb Bridge
None.
Jones Bridge
The grass along the wood line at the east corner of the parking lot. Starting 30’ north of the restroom sidewalk an area 20’ by 60’.
Medlock Bridge
The pavement south of the entrance road at the southwest corner of the parking lot. Starting at the first parking space an area 20’ by 40’.
Abbotts Bridge
The grass along the field southwest of the entrance road, east of the parking lot, northwest of the ditch in the field and north of the restroom. Starting 20’ from the entrance road and parking lot an area 20’ by 40’.
Suwanee Creek
None.
McGinnis Ferry
None.
Settles Bridge
None.
Orrs Ferry
None.
Bowman’s Island
None.
 
Map of the Cochran Shoals Unit showing trail use including multi-use trails.

Appendix B

Cochran Shoals Bicycle Route Map

Last updated: December 11, 2017

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

1978 Island Ford Parkway
Sandy Springs, GA 30350

Phone:

(678) 538-1200

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