Implementation

Color photo of the signature page of the Chamizal Convention of 1963 containing the signatures and wax seals of US Ambassador Thomas C. Mann and Mexico's Secretary for Foreign Relations Manuel Tello.
Photograph of the signature and seal page of the Chamizal Convention of 1963, courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration.

NPS

In July 1963, after thirteen months, US and Mexican negotiators finally reached agreement. On August 29, Mexican Secretary for Foreign Relations Manuel Tello and US Ambassador Thomas C. Mann signed the Chamizal Convention of 1963 in Mexico City. The hard work wasn’t over yet. It took commitment and sacrifice to turn the paper agreement into practical reality.

 
A black-and-white aerial photo with text and drawings showing the planned relocation of the Rio Grande and land transfer.
Aerial view of Chamizal zone showing the planned relocation of the Rio Grande in blue and the lands to be transferred (630 total acres to Mexico and 193 acres to the United States) to implement the Chamizal Convention of 1963

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO LIBRARY

In order to exchange land with Mexico to settle the Chamizal dispute, the US federal government purchased both private and commercial properties. Nearly 5600 residents of El Paso neighborhoods such as Rio Linda and Cordova Gardens were required to move. Property owners received at least fair market value and were compensated for moving and some other expenses.

Personal Perspectives

 
Black-and-white photo of backyard of one-story. A boy stands near the back door behind the chain-link fence in the foreground. A swingset stands against the right side of the house.
Photo of backyard of the home of William Bass taken by IBWC real estate appraiser William E. Wood, Jr.. Parcel D-38.

NPS / WILLIAM E. WOOD, JR.


William Bass

“I’m very satisfied."


 
 

The complete William Bass interview is available online through the University of Texas at El Paso Oral History Department.

 
Black-and-white photo of a one-story grocery store. A 1950's era pickup truck and car are parked in front of the store. A sign over the entrance reads "Los Alamos Grocery" and has round CocaCola signs on either side.
Photo of Los Alamos Grocery Store (owned by Ana Parra and her husband) taken by IBWC real estate appraiser William E. Wood, Jr.. Parcel D-126.

NPS / WILLIAM E. WOOD, JR.


Ana Parra

"They told us that they would pay all our losses, but it was not that way."


 
 

The complete Ana Parra interview in Spanish is available online through the University of Texas at El Paso Oral History Department.

 
Man wearing a wide, red, patterned headband; a red, patterned shirt with green and black ribbons across his chest; and a red, black, and green patterned sash around his waist.
Javier Loera, War Captain, Ysleta del Sur Pueblo Tribal Council

NPS / BRIAN KANOF


Javier Loera

“First and foremost of most importance is our traditions. . . . they must continue. . . . as a tribe we must be respectful and continue our ceremonies and traditions.”


 
 

Last updated: October 20, 2020

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800 South San Marcial Street
El Paso, TX 79905

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915-532-7273

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