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    Yosemite

    National Park California

Park Ranger Shelton Johnson Receives Environmental Leadership Award

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Date: April 15, 2011

Johnson Received Award at Tilden Park in Berkeley, California

Yosemite National Park Ranger Shelton Johnson received the Environmental Leadership Award from the Ecology Law Quarterly Journal on Thursday, April 7, 2011. The Environmental Leadership Award is given to an individual who has made outstanding contributions to the development of environmental law and policy. Johnson received a plaque and presented the keynote speech at the banquet for the award presentation.

Past environmental leadership award winners include renowned environmentalist and author David Brower, prolific author and professor Joseph Sax, and Johanna Wald, Senior Attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council.  

“I am very honored to receive this important recognition of my work from the U.C. Berkeley Law School's Environmental Law Quarterly. It's a wonderful encouragement to continue our efforts to reach out to new audiences in order to fully embrace the democratic ideal which is enshrined in our national parks,” said Ranger Johnson at the award ceremony.

Shelton Johnson has worked for the National Park Service for over 20 years. Prior to working in Yosemite National Park, Johnson worked in Yellowstone National Park, Great Basin National Park, and the National Mall in Washington D.C.  

Ecology Law Quarterly (ELQ), an environmental law journal, was established in 1971. In 1990, ELQ was placed on the United Nations Environmental Program Global 500 Roll of Honour for Environmental Achievement, which is one of the most prominent awards in the international environmental field. ELQ is managed by U.C. Berkeley School of Law.

Did You Know?

Sierra Sweet Bay

In Wawona and downstream, the South Fork Merced River provides habitat for a rare plant, the Sierra sweet bay (Myrica hartwegii). This special status shrub is found in only five Sierra Nevada counties. In Yosemite, it occurs exclusively on sand bars and river banks along the South Fork Merced River downstream from Wawona and on Big Creek.