• Rainbow over Half Dome

    Yosemite

    National Park California

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  • Road Closures Due to El Portal Fire

    The Big Oak Flat Road between Crane Flat and the El Portal Road is temporarily closed. There is no access to Yosemite Valley via the Big Oak Flat Road or Highway 120. Tioga Road is open and accessible via Big Oak Flat and Tioga Pass Entrances. More »

  • Campground Closures Due to Fire

    Crane Flat, Bridalveil Creek, and Yosemite Creek Campgrounds are temporarily closed. More »

  • Yosemite National Park is Open

    Yosemite Valley, Glacier Point, and Wawona/Mariposa Grove areas are open and accessible via Highways 140 and 41. Tioga Road is not accessible via Highways 140 and 41 due to a fire.

Yosemite National Park Cautions Poachers

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Date: October 14, 2008

On Saturday, October 4th, 2008, Yosemite law enforcement rangers from Mather district, Valley district, and Wawona district arrested a 62 year old man from Merced, California for violating Title 16 USC 60, hunting within the boundaries of Yosemite National Park.

A tip from California Fish and Game led investigators to the location of a tree-stand well inside the park boundary. After three weeks of surveillance the suspect was arrested. He admitted to shooting a deer, also within the park boundary, in 2007.

Yosemite National Park officials strongly urge caution when hunting in the surrounding areas of the park boundary.

Steve Yu, a Special Agent for Yosemite National Park cautions, "It is the responsibility of the hunter to be aware of national park boundaries."

Hunters traveling through the park to other locations are required to store firearms out of reach and separate from any ammunition. If the firearm is equipped with a bolt-action, officials request it be removed and also stored separately from the firearm.

Did You Know?

Nevada and Vernal Falls

In Yosemite Valley, dropping over 594-foot Nevada Fall and then 317-foot Vernal Fall, the Merced River creates what is known as the “Giant Staircase.” Such exemplary stair-step river morphology is characterized by a large variability in river movement and flow, from quiet pools to the dramatic drops of the waterfalls themselves.