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Yosemite National Park Extends Public Comment Period for the Merced River Plan

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Date: April 16, 2013

Comments on Draft Plan to be accepted through April 30, 2013
 
Yosemite National Park announces the extension of the public comment period for the Merced Wild and Scenic River Draft Comprehensive Management and Environmental Impact Statement (MRP) through Tuesday, April 30, 2013. Previously, the public comment period was slated to close on Thursday, April 18, 2013.

"The MRP is an expansive document which guides park management actions for many years. We want to make sure the public has a thorough opportunity to review the draft plan and submit comments," stated Kathleen Morse, Yosemite National Park's Chief of Planning.

This extension adds twelve days to the one hundred day the public comment period. The document was released for public review and comment on January 8, 2013. So far, the park has received about 25,000 comments.

For a copy of the plan and a complete description of all alternatives, please visit the park's website at www.nps.gov/yose/parkmgmt/mrp.htm. Comments on the MRP can be made through the, and Public Comment (PEPC) website at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/mrp_deis. Comments made through the PEPC website are the preferred method of submission. However, comments can also be sent via email or via U.S. mail to:
Superintendent

Yosemite National Park
Attn: Merced River Plan
P.O. Box 577
Yosemite, CA 95389
 
Based on a Settlement Agreement the park reached with the plaintiffs in September 2009, the MRP is mandated to be completed by the end of July 2013. The extension of the comment period will allow for park staff to collect and analyze all public comments which will become a part of the Final Merced River Plan.

Did You Know?

Low intensity fire in Yosemite

Natural fires in Yosemite are often no more than a single burning snag (standing dead tree) or a slow moving, low intensity fire that cleans underbrush from the forest floor. These fires prevent unwanted fires by removing accumulating forest debris that can fuel a larger fire in hot, dry conditions.