• Rainbow over Half Dome

    Yosemite

    National Park California

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  • Road Closures Due to El Portal Fire

    The Big Oak Flat Road between Crane Flat and the El Portal Road is temporarily closed. There is no access to Yosemite Valley via the Big Oak Flat Road or Highway 120. Tioga Road is open and accessible via Big Oak Flat and Tioga Pass Entrances. More »

  • Campground Closures Due to Fire

    Crane Flat, Bridalveil Creek, and Yosemite Creek Campgrounds are temporarily closed. More »

  • Yosemite National Park is Open

    Yosemite Valley, Glacier Point, and Wawona/Mariposa Grove areas are open and accessible via Highways 140 and 41. Tioga Road is not accessible via Highways 140 and 41 due to a fire.

Hiker Dies on Half Dome in Yosemite National Park

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Date: June 18, 2007

Hirofumi Nohara, 37, slipped and fell while ascending the Half Dome cables on June 16, 2007 at around 2:30 pm. Nohara, a Japanese citizen in the United States on a work visa, was hiking with four friends when the fall occurred. Nohara fell approximately 300 feet from the left side of the cables, and was pronounced dead at the scene. An investigation into the cause of the slip and subsequent fall is underway.

The Half Dome hike is a round-trip hike of 17 miles and considered extremely strenuous. Hikers gain 4,800 feet of elevation along the hike that passes such highlights as Vernal Fall, Nevada Fall, and Half Dome itself. A series of metal cables are placed along the steep shoulder of the dome to assist hikers to the summit. Visitors are advised to take appropriate precautions when attempting a hike of this length and difficulty, and to be prepared for changing weather and trail conditions.

For more information about hiking safety, please refer to Yosemite's website at www.nps.gov/yose.

Did You Know?

Nevada and Vernal Falls

In Yosemite Valley, dropping over 594-foot Nevada Fall and then 317-foot Vernal Fall, the Merced River creates what is known as the “Giant Staircase.” Such exemplary stair-step river morphology is characterized by a large variability in river movement and flow, from quiet pools to the dramatic drops of the waterfalls themselves.