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Yosemite National Park Announces Public Scoping for the Rehabilitation of the Badger Pass Ski Lodge Environmental Assessment

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Date: December 22, 2008

Yosemite National Park is announcing the public scoping period for the Badger Pass Ski Lodge Rehabilitation Environmental Assessment (EA).  Public scoping comments will be used to assist the park in developing a range of reasonable and feasible project alternatives that meet the purpose and need, including a no action alternative, and then analyzing the environmental effects of each alternative.  A 30-day public scoping period for this EA will open on January 14, 2009 and will extend through February 13, 2009. Written comments should be postmarked no later than February 13, 2009.
 
The Badger Pass Ski Lodge, constructed in 1935, is historically significant as the first alpine ski resort in California and as an example of NPS Rustic architecture with Swiss chalet influences. The project area is located at an elevation of 7200 feet at the Badger Pass Ski Area, midway between Wawona and Yosemite Valley in Yosemite National Park. The lodge is situated in Monroe Meadow on the south side of Glacier Point Road, approximately 5.1 miles east of Chinquapin.  The lodge is accessible year round via Glacier Point Road and has served as a family ski area and winter recreation center in Yosemite since 1935.  
 
The purpose of the rehabilitation project is to provide a phased program for rehabilitation of the Badger Pass Ski Lodge that will:

  • Maintain and protect the integrity of the historic Badger Pass Day Lodge and character-defining features of the Badger Pass cultural landscape;
  • Treat critical deck, structural, and drainage deficiencies contributing to past and ongoing water-intrusion damage;
  • Replace temporary structures with permanent buildings of compatible construction to maintain continued ski area operations; and
  • Maintain ski area service and support functions while protecting the winter recreation visitor experience at Badger Pass Ski Area.
The rehabilitation would protect areas of primary historical significance, while allowing flexibility to accommodate the needs associated with current and future Ski Area use in non-character-defining areas.

Repair and rehabilitation of the ski lodge are necessary to protect its historic integrity, assure visitor safety, and maintain ski-area visitor services while preserving the natural and cultural resources at the ski area. Therefore, an environmental assessment will evaluate potential environmental impacts associated with the rehabilitation project.

A public open house will take place on January 28, 2009 from 1pm to 4pm in the Valley Visitor Center Auditorium in Yosemite Valley.  Park Admission fees will be waived for those attending the open house.

An additional public scoping meeting is scheduled for the afternoon of Friday, February 6, 2009 from 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm in the Snow Flake Room at Badger Pass Ski Area.

Comments can be submitted at public meetings, by mail, fax, email, and through the Planning, Environment, and Public Comment (PEPC) commenting system. Comments may be submitted by the following means:

Mail:
Superintendent
Attn: Badger Pass Ski Lodge Rehabilitation
P.O. Box 577
Yosemite, CA 95389

Phone: 209/379-1365;   Fax: 209/379-1294
E-mail: Yose_Planning@nps.gov
Visit online: www.nps.gov/yose/planning
Web: A new way to submit comments is available online. It’s called PEPC (Planning,
Environment, and Public Comment). Access the site at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/yose

Did You Know?

Merced River Gorge

Descending from Yosemite Valley, the Merced River becomes a continuous cascade in a narrow gorge littered by massive boulders. Dropping 2,000 feet in 14 miles, canyon walls rise steeply from the river and have many seasonal waterfalls cascading down to the river.