• Rainbow over Half Dome

    Yosemite

    National Park California

Yosemite Ranger Notes

About This Blog

Ranger-naturalists have been interpreting the natural and cultural resources of Yosemite for park visitors for nearly a century. In this blog, some of Yosemite's park rangers share recent observations from around Yosemite.

All posts are shown below, or you can view posts by topic.

Monitoring Birds in the Park, Part 3: A Bird in the Hand

July 28, 2014 Posted by: ET - Park Ranger (Big Oak Flat)

While most of us are still asleep at 5 AM, Yosemite’s bird researchers are already hanging mist nets and sipping coffee as their day begins. The sun rises as the birds sing their morning chorus, and soon the banding station is busy with the processing of information on the netted birds. This posting is a summary of the birds captured June 20 through July 15, 2014.

 

Monitoring Birds in the Park, Part 2

July 21, 2014 Posted by: ET - Park Ranger (Big Oak Flat)

A wide diversity of bird calls ring loud and clear every morning and there is a constant hubbub of birds flying by, delivering food to mates and hungry chicks. The bird researchers with the Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) project are already midway through their summer season. There is much to be learned from the birds, and Yosemite’s avian monitoring projects are hugely important.

 

Monitoring Birds in the Park, Part 1

July 16, 2014 Posted by: ET - Park Ranger (Big Oak Flat)

The male Lawrence’s goldfinch dazzles with its shiny black face, gray back, and bright yellow chest, especially if your view is from just three feet away. I am in Hodgdon Meadow on June 12, 2014 with the bird researchers who are in charge of Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS)....

 

First Automobile Permit Issued 100 Years Ago

August 23, 2013 Posted by: JT - Park Ranger/Web Manager (Yosemite Valley)

On August 28, 1913, Park Ranger Forest Townsley issued the first automobile permit in Yosemite National Park. While early visitors had driven automobiles in Yosemite as early as 1900, cars weren’t formally allowed until 1913.

 

Did You Know?

The Bachelor and Three Graces

Giant sequoias are a fire adapted species. Their bark is fire resistant and fire helps open the sequoia cone and scatter the tiny seeds. Fire also clears forest debris from the mineral soil and provides a nutrient rich seed bed as well as clearing competing species.