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The National Park Service Turns 96!

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Date: August 15, 2012
Contact: Ed Cummins, 928-567-3322 x227

National Park Service News Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - AUGUST 15, 2012
E
D CUMMINS, CHIEF RANGER, MOCA/TUZI, 928-567-3322 X227

The National Park Service Turns 96!

Montezuma Castle-Montezuma Well & Tuzigoot National Monuments Celebrate the 96th Birthday of the National Park Service

Camp Verde-Montezuma Castle-Montezuma Well & Tuzigoot National Monuments will celebrate the 96th birthday of the National Park Service by holding youth-centered art events at all three sites from 9:00 AM to 2:00 PM on Saturday, August 25. Art played a major role in the creation of National Parks by bringing the beauty and splendor of our nation's landscapes to the attention of Congress and the public. The national park concept is credited to artist George Catlin who wrote in 1832 about the need for a "nation's park" to preserve and protect the wilderness and wildlife of our nation. To honor the impact of art in the history of the National Park Service, the staff of Montezuma Castle and Tuzigoot National Monuments invites children of all ages-our future stewards-to come out and get creative. We will provide art supplies for children to illustrate their experience at our parks and capture their beauty on paper. For children who would like to share their art with the world, we may display some work on our website! This birthday celebration is a perfect time to nurture life-long connections to the outdoors and the incredible heritage of our country, so come out and join the party!

"Birthdays are a time to celebrate and we want everyone, especially the children of America, to join the party," said Park Superintendent Dorothy FireCloud. "National parks belong to all Americans and offer something for everyone - so visit the park, wander the trail, and take in the scenery. Children especially enjoy the popular Junior Ranger program where they earn a badge by completing a Junior Ranger Activity Guide."

The National Park Service was established on August 25, 1916. The United States was the first country in the world to set aside its most significant places as national parks so that they could be enjoyed by all. Today, we care for 397 national park units throughout the country - each one an important part of our collective identity. Some parks commemorate notable people and achievements, others conserve magnificent landscapes and natural wonders, and all provide a place to have fun and learn something. Plan your visit at www.nps.gov/findapark.

The mission of the National Park Service extends beyond parks into communities across the country where we work with partners to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities that revitalize neighborhoods and enhance the quality of life. To see what we do here in Arizona, go to www.nps.gov/AZ.

Regular entrance fees will be collected at both Montezuma Castle and Tuzigoot--$5 per adult, children 15 and under are free. The Federal Annual, Access, Military, and Senior passes are also accepted. Montezuma Well, as always, is free. Regular operating hours are 8am-5pm, every day except Christmas Day, when the sites are closed.

For more information about Montezuma Castle National Monument, including Montezuma

Well, see out website at www.nps.gov/moca. For information on Tuzigoot National Monument, see www.nps.gov/tuzi.

--NPS--

Did You Know?

MOCA Arizona Sycamore

Because the Arizona Sycamore only grows along constant water sources it is not a good source for dating archaeological sites with tree rings. The Sinagua of Tuzigoot National Monument relied heavily on the native sycamore for support beams and ladders.