• Sunlight illuminates the top of historic Mission San José de Tumacácori church.

    Tumacácori

    National Historical Park Arizona

Juan Bautista Nentvig

Siege at Tubutama

Siege at Tubutama

Padre Nentvig entered the Jesuit Order on August 28, 1744 and arrived in New Spain in August of 1750. By 1751 he was at Sáric where he barely escaped the Pima uprising. By 1752 he was at his final post of Huásabas, although he appears in the Suamca register in 1753 and at Tecoripa in 1755. His vision began to fail in 1763 but he managed to complete "Rudo Ensayo" that year. He succeeded Manuel Aguirre as local visitador in 1766 even though he was nearly blind. He did not survive during the expulsion of the Jesuits and, of the seven priests whose names appear in the Guevavi and Suamca mission records, who died on the forced march through the coastal jungles between Tepic, Nayarit, and Guadalajara, Jalisco (Nicolás Perera, Alexandro Rapicani, Francisco Hlava, Juan Nentvig, Pedro Díaz, Manuel Aguirre, and Bartolomé Saenz), he was the fourth to die, at fifty-five years, five months, and fourteen days of age. Like the three who preceded him and Padre Díaz who followed him in death, he died at Ixtlán, Nayarit.

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Did You Know?

Mountains above Rancho Arizona

Arizona takes its name from a ranch of the same name, meaning "the good oak tree" in Basque, established by Bernardo de Urrea in 1735 in the rugged, mountain country about forty miles southwest of Tumacácori.