• Trail of Tears artwork and trail walk

    Trail Of Tears

    National Historic Trail AL,AR,GA,IL,KY,MO,NC,OK,TN

Exhibits

Exhibits along the water route of the Trail of Tears at Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge, Arkansas
Exhibits along the water route of the Trail of Tears at Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge, Arkansas 
US Fish and Wildlife Service
 

While American settlers clamored for more land, native tribes signed more than 40 treaties ceding their lands to the US. The Indian Removal Act of 1830 significantly altered a way of life for eastern Indian tribes. Read the stories of the Trail of Tears through original exhibits by choosing from the list in the left menu bar. Return often.

 

All exhibits can be viewed using Adobe Acrobat Reader. To download this (free) program, click here. If you have a slow internet connection, it may take a few minutes to access the exhibit files.

Did You Know?

Elkhorn Tavern at Pea Ridge, Arkansas, on the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail

President Andrew Jackson began to aggressively implement a broad policy of Indian removal in the 1830s. This policy, combined with the discovery of gold on Cherokee land in northern Georgia in 1828, led to their removal to Indian Territory (Oklahoma) on the Trail of Tears.