• Lower Cliff Dwelling

    Tonto

    National Monument Arizona

Enabling Legislation

TONTO NATIONAL MONUMENT

Establishment: Proclamation (No. 787) of December 19, 1907

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

(No. 787-Dec. 19, 1907-35 Stat. 2168)

WHEREAS, two prehistoric ruins of ancient cliff dwellings situated upon public lands of the United States, and located in the region commonly known as the Tonto Drainage Basin, about two miles south of the Salt River Reservoir, Gila County, Arizona, are of great ethnologic, scientific and educational interest and it appears that the public interests would be promoted by reserving these relics of a vanished people as a National Monument with as much land as may be necessary for the proper protection thereof;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Theodore Roosevelt, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the power in me vested by section two of the Act of Congress approved June 8, 1906, National Monument, subject to any valid interest or rights, the prehistoric cliff dwelling ruins and one section of land upon which same are located, situated in Gila County, Arizona, more particularly described as follows, to wit:

Section thirty-four, unsurveyed, in township four north, range twelve east of the Gila and Salt River Meridian, Arizona, as shown upon the diagram hereto attached and made a part of this Proclamation.

Warning is hereby expressly given to all unauthorized persons not to appropriate, excavate, injure or destroy any of the prehistoric ruins or remains thereof declared to be a National Monument, or to locate or settle upon any of the lands reserved and made a part of said Monument by this Proclamation.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

DONE at the City of Washington this 19th day of December in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and seven, and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and thirty-second.

Theodore Roosevelt

Did You Know?

crested saguaro

Tonto National Monument is home to a crested saguaro. Botanists disagree as to why some saguaros grow in this unusual form. Some speculate that it is a genetic mutation. Others say it is the result of lightning or freeze damage. About one in 150,000 saguaros develop this unusual growth.