• Afternoon clouds cover the distance peaks of the iconic Boney Mountain

    Santa Monica Mountains

    National Recreation Area California

National Park Service to Host April 15-16 Science Festival

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Date: March 28, 2011

National Park Service to Host April 15-16 Science Festival

(Agoura Hills, CA) Come discover your neighborhood national park at the second annual Santa Monica Mountains Science Festival. The event is free and open to the public. Hours are 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Friday, April 15th, and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, April 16th at Paramount Ranch in Agoura Hills.

The festival will offer a variety of programs that appeal to children and adults alike. On Friday evening, join park rangers and regional scientists to experience the mountains after dark. A campfire sing-along, bug collecting, owl presentation and banding demonstration, and bat identification await all who venture into the wild after sundown.

On Saturday, a variety of special presentations and hands-on demonstrations promise to delight participants young and young. Scientists and researchers from the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, Channel Islands National Park, Cabrillo National Monument, and Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County will provide updates on the health of our natural resources, including reptiles and amphibians, carnivore populations, native plants, and marine resources. Live animal demonstrations, bilingual hikes, and plant pressing will engage audiences who want to touch and discover the world around them. In addition to scheduled programs, many booths and games will be available for more scientific discovery throughout the day.

For more information, please call the National Park Service Visitor Center at 805-370-2301 or visit the event website: http://www.nps.gov/samo/sciencefestival.htm.

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Did You Know?

The adult female of this cub died in 2005.

A study that began in 2002 reveals a lion and his offspring are surviving in the Santa Monica Mountains. Radio collars track them crossing roads and navigating through open spaces. Their future is uncertain, but with conservation efforts, they may continue to make these mountains their home.