• Stars appear behind a dramatic landscape of rocky mountains, rolling hills, and fields of grass

    Santa Monica Mountains

    National Recreation Area California

NPS to host free lecture on 19th century Native American woman

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Date: March 7, 2012
Contact: Margie Steigerwald, 805-370-2373

(THOUSAND OAKS, CA) In honor of Women's History Month, the National Park Service is sponsoring a free lecture by Moorpark College Professor Susan Kinkella on the fascinating life of a 19th century Native American woman who lived near present-day Calabasas.

The 2:00 p.m. program on Saturday, March 24 will provide highlights from the life of Espiritu Chijulla, the daughter of a Chumash chief and the wife of Miguel Leonis, the namesake for the Leonis Adobe in Calabasas. Professor Kinkella will share the tale she uncovered while conducting research for a book about Chijulla. Kinkella says that Espiritu Chijulla lived "during times of great transition and upheaval"-the "Wild West" of 19th century Calabasas.

Professor Kinkella has both a bachelor's and a master's degree from California State University, Northridge. She has focused her studies on 20th century American history, specializing in American women and Native American history.

The free lecture will be from 2-3:30 p.m. Saturday, March 24 at the visitor center, 401 W. Hillcrest Drive. Reservations are not required. For additional information call the visitor center at 805-370-2301.

Directions to NPS Headquarters Visitor Center: - Exit Ventura Fwy (101) to Lynn Rd., North on Lynn Rd. Turn east (right) on Hillcrest Dr. Left on McCloud Ave. Turn into first driveway on the right. Follow road to the end. Turn right and park. Walk towards the buildings. The meeting room is down the stairs.

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Did You Know?

Rangers from California State Parks and the National Park Service discuss program ideas.

Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area was established in 1978, but the National Park Service did not own public parkland in the area until 1980. National Park Rangers devised clever ways to promote the national park goals without land by creating thriving partnerships with many agencies.