• The Little Studio and Saint-Gaudens' home

    Saint-Gaudens

    National Historic Site New Hampshire

Sculptor-in-Residence Program

working on a piece in the Ravine Studio

A clay sculpture by the Sculptor-in-Residence, Leesa Haapapuro, 2008

Each year Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site offers an artist the opportunity to serve as sculptor-in-residence. Because of the nature of the site and the position, this artist residency is specifically for figurative sculptors.

The sculptor serves an important role in the Site's interpretive program, allowing visitors to see how an artist works, ask questions, and thus learn something about the sculptural process. For this reason, while the sculptor works on his/her own art, it must be representational in form, either in the round, or in relief, using the same basic techniques as Saint-Gaudens (1848-1907), i.e. working with clay and casting in plaster.

The artist should have a thorough knowledge of the lost wax casting process in order to explain this to visitors. The sculptor also conducts a series of 15-18 half-day sculpture workshops for adults. With extensive visitor contact, it is very important that this person be very comfortable interacting with the public.

This position is a wonderful opportunity for sculptors. Not only does the artist have the chance to spend the summer working on his/her art and receive excellent public exposure, they do so in one of New England's most beautiful and culturally significant settings.

The Sculptor-in-Residence is a paid position, 40 hours a week from mid May through late October. The artist has exclusive use of the Ravine Studio. Clay, plaster, sculpture stands and some other materials are provided. The position is usually advertised in January or February each year on the usajobs section of the www.OPM.gov web site (www.usajobs.gov) Applications must be on line through that site. Interested sculptors should contact the park in January to see what the status of the position is for the coming year.

For more information, specific questions, or to be alerted when the position is advertised, please contact Gregory Schwarz, Chief of Interpretation, at (603) 675-2175 x107.

Did You Know?

Relief of Robert Louis Stevenson by Augustus Saint-Gaudens

Bas-relief is the most difficult form of sculpture. The detail is achieved by the way that light strikes the relief’s shallow surface, creating shadows that give an illusion of depth. Some of Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ portrait reliefs are only 1/8th of an inch deep.