• Image of coast redwood forest along Cal-Barrel Road

    Redwood

    National and State Parks California

Park Planning

Redwood National Park prepares a variety of planning and environmental documents to help guide the management of park resources.
-For current projects that are open for public comment, click here.
-For archived projects, click here.

 

Fire Management Plan
The 2010 Redwood National Park Fire Management Plan describes how fire and fuels will be managed in the national park from 2010 through 2015.
Fire Management Plan (2010) (PDF, 2.76 MB)
Fire Management Plan (2010), Appendix M: Fire Monitoring Plan (6.45 MB)
More fire management information is available here.

 

Long-Range Interpretive Plan
The Long-Range Interpretive Plans (LRIP) is a component of a Comprehensive Interpretive Plan (CIP) and provide a vision for the future (5-10 years) of interpretation, education, and visitor experience opportunities. They identify and analyze interpretation, education, and visitor experience goals and issues. They recommend the most effective, efficient, and practical ways to address those goals and issues.

Redwood National and State Parks Long-Range Interpretive Plan (2003) (PDF, 983 KB)

 

General Management Plan/General Plan 2000.
Guidance is needed for managing the parks. The national park is required to prepare a general management plan; the state parks are required to prepare a general plan. The purpose of a joint federal-state plan is to provide a clearly defined, coordinated direction for resource preservation and visitor use and a basic foundation for decision making and managing these four parks for the next 15 to 20 years. Introduction (PDF 3 MB). The Plan (PDF, 9.68 MB). The 2000 Record of Decision (PDF 164 KB) summarizes and documents the decision of the NPS to undertake the actions described in the 1999 Final Environmental Impact Statement for the General Management Plan.

 

Second Growth Forest Restoration

The focus of second-growth forest restoration is to reduce stand density (thinning) to promote growth and maintain vigor of the remaining trees while protecting adjacent old-growth forests; maintaining water quality in riparian habitats; minimizing tanoak tree disturbance; and minimizing excessive fuel build-up on the forest floor.

In 2011, Redwood National Park completed a project to thin about 1,700 acres of second growth forest in the South Fork of Lost Man Creek (near the community of Orick, Calif.) to accelerate the restoration of old-growth characteristics and functions. The Finding of No Significant Impact summarizes the conservation planning that is described in more detail in the South Fork Lost Man Creek Second Growth Forest Restoration Environmental Assessment. For more information on the South Fork Lost Man Creek Forest Restoration, click here.

 

Redwood National Park and Green Diamond Resource Company Rights-of-Ways Exchange.
The National Park Service has granted rights-of-ways (ROWs) to Green Diamond Resource Company (GDRCo) for use of some existing roads in Redwood National Park in exchange for deeded ROWs from GDRCo for park use of some existing roads on GDRCo lands. A Finding of No Significant Impact (1.09 MB pdf) on Rights-of-Way Exchange between Green Diamondd and Redwood National and State Parks has been signed. The ROW Exchange Environmental Assessment (1.08 MB pdf) has been completed.

Special Use Permits - Sign up for small, medium, and large events in RNSP. (209 KB WORD doc) Look here for information on scattering ashes (26 KB WORD doc); the same Special Use Permit must be used.

 

Trail and Backcountry Management Plan
Redwood National and State Parks is currently planning for the expansion of the parks' trail and backcountry system. In the works: nine new hiking trails, additional mountain bike trails, increased opportunities for backcountry camping, relocating one of the equestrian camps along the Orick Horse Trails, and creating trail links between the national park and adjacent public lands in Humboldt and Del Norte counties.

Download the Trail and Backcountry Plan (PDF 1MB).
For more information on the Trail and Backcountry Management Plan, click here.

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