• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

Multimedia Presentations: Documentary Videos

The following videos are available for use with either QuickTime or Windows Media Player as "Low," "Medium," and "High" quality videos. The "Low" and "Medium" quality videos have a screen size of 320 pixels x 240 pixels, and the "High" quality videos have a screen size of 640 pixels x 480 pixels. All videos were compressed to 30 frames per second and have data rates of 270 to 383 Kbps for "Low" quality videos; 679 to 817 Kbps for "Medium" quality videos; and 1.46 to 1.86 Mbps for "High" quality videos.

 

Elephant Seals: Our Window To The Ocean, a 10 minute documentary filmed at Point Reyes National Seashore in Marin County, California, depicts the remarkable and uplifting story of the northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris). Since time immemorial, vast numbers of elephant seals could be found breeding, molting, and rearing their young on the western seashores of North America. In the late 19th century American whalers hunted them to the point of near-extinction. The documentary describes how the recent resurgence of the elephant seal population at Point Reyes National Seashore and in the greater Pacific Ocean demonstrates the success of marine conservation laws and threatened species protections.
Produced by the Pacific Coast Science and Learning Center
Written, directed, and Edited by Benjamin Bettenhausen
Total Run Time: 9:34 minutes
QuickTime: Low (24,274 KB) | Medium (48,002 KB) | High (117,140 KB)
Windows Media Video: Low (27,508 KB) | Medium (57,912 KB) | High (130,976 KB)

 

Sudden Oak Death: Battling an Invasive Disease explores the story of Phytophthora ramorum, a brown water mold of foreign origins which causes the disease known as Sudden Oak Death. This disease, which has been killing Tanoak trees at an alarming rate, was first documented in Marin County in the mid-1990s and has since spread up and down the North American west coast. Sudden Oak Death documents the history of the disease, describes its pathology, and explains what measures may prevent its spread in the future.
Produced by the Pacific Coast Science and Learning Center
Written, directed, and Edited by Benjamin Bettenhausen
Total Run Time: 10 minutes
QuickTime: Low (26,391 KB) | Medium (52,442 KB) | High (108,248 KB)
Windows Media Video: Low (22,267 KB) | Medium (57,211 KB) | High (101,822 KB)

 

Tule Elk: California’s Legacy of Wildness chronicles the fascinating and inspirational story of the tule elk (Cervus canadensis nannodes) which are native to California and can be viewed at the Tomales Point Tule Elk Reserve. Since pre-historic times, large herds of tule elk roamed California’s central valley and coastal plains. Unfortunately, they were hunted to near-extinction by the late 19th century. Tule Elk examines how the dramatic rebound of the tule elk population at Point Reyes National Seashore and in California at large demonstrates the success of threatened species protections and conservation laws.
Produced by the Pacific Coast Science and Learning Center
Written, directed, and Edited by Benjamin Bettenhausen
Total Run Time: 10 minutes
QuickTime: Low (19,846 KB) | Medium (58,722 KB) | High (116,795 KB)
Windows Media Video: Low (23,151 KB) | Medium (59,466 KB) | High (105,807 KB)

 

If any of the multimedia presentations do not play on your computer, you may not have the latest version of QuickTime or Windows Media Player.

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Did You Know?

Bull Elephant Seal © Richard Allen

Elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) regularly plunge to depths of 2000 feet to find food, but even far below the ocean's surface they are affected by warming temperatures and melting Antarctic ice. More...