• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

Olema Valley Prescribed Burns Planned for Weeks of October 9 and 16, 2011

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Date: October 5, 2011
Contact: Jennifer Chapman, 415-464-5133

Fire Management staff at Point Reyes National Seashore are planning two days of controlled burning along Highway One in the Olema Valley during the next two weeks. The first burn is tentatively scheduled for Wednesday, October 12, but the date may change based on weather and air quality conditions. The area to be burned is in two units that make up a total of 80 acres on the east side of Highway One. The location is approximately 7 miles south of Olema, between the Randall Trail and Dogtown. These burns are part of a strategy to create a fuel break along Highway One where a wildfire would be easier to control. A wildfire in this area could spread to Bolinas and Stinson Beach or cross into the Marin Municipal Water District and threaten Kent Lake, the county's largest reservoir.

The target burn rotation for the Highway One burn units is every other year to reduce the invasive French broom population and maintain open grasslands in between large areas of dense forest on Bolinas Ridge and Inverness Ridge.

The McCurdy Trail will be closed on the day of the first burn. No road closures are anticipated, however, there may be short traffic delays along Highway One while burning is in progress. Short term smoke impacts are expected with possible smoke settling in the San Geronimo Valley. Smoke sensitive individuals are encouraged to take actions to avoid or minimize exposure. See www.airquality.org/smokeimpact/ for details.

The Seashore also plans an additional day of small research burns at D-ranch in October. To receive an email when the burn days are confirmed, contact the fire education office at 415-464-5133 or by email.

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Point Reyes Lighthouse

The Point Reyes Lighthouse was completed in 1870, 16 years after Congress initially appropriated funds for its construction. It still stands in its original location, having weathered over 140 years at what is considered to be the windiest, foggiest location on the US west coast. More...