• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

Draft Non-Native Deer Management Plan Available for Public Review

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Date: February 3, 2005
Contact: John Dell'Osso, 415-464-5135

Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the National Park Service has prepared a draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS)/Non-Native Deer Management Plan for Point Reyes National Seashore. Point Reyes National Seashore proposes removal of the non-native axis and fallow deer within the Seashore, through a combination of long-duration contraception and lethal control. Nonnative deer were introduced to the area in the 1940s from the San Francisco Zoo, before the Seashore was established. A management plan is needed because the populations of the two non-native deer are rapidly expanding and currently number over 1,000 animals. In addition, the timing of the plan is critical since non-native deer are expanding eastwards, and will soon establish resident populations in the lands outside National Park Service boundaries.

The Environmental Impact Statement is available on-line from the Seashore’s website at http://www.nps.gov/pore “Management Documents.” If you wish to obtain a CD or hardcopy version of the document, you may email Ann Nelson (in subject line type: Non-Native Deer Management Plan) and a copy will be mailed to you.

A public information workshop will be held at Point Reyes National Seashore Park Headquarters on Thursday, March 3, between 6:30 and 8:30 pm in the Red Barn Classroom. The meeting will provide background information regarding the proposed plan and the alternatives for management of the exotic deer.

Persons who wish to submit written comments on the draft Environmental Impact Statement are encouraged to do so. Written comments may be mailed to Superintendent, Point Reyes National Seashore, Point Reyes, CA 94956, Attention: Non-Native Deer Management Plan, or emailed to Ann Nelson. The draft Plan and DEIS will be available for comments for a 60-day period. All comments must be postmarked or transmitted no later than Friday, April 8, 2005.

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Spotted towhee. Dave Menke / FWS.

Point Reyes has some of the greatest avian diversity of any U.S. national park, with more than 490 species of birds recorded (45% of species of birds in North America). More...