• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

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Coastal Restoration at Point Reyes National Seashore

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Date: October 22, 2004
Contact: John Dell’Osso, 415-464-5135
Contact: Jane Rodgers, 415-464-5190

Point Reyes National Seashore is stepping up efforts to improve habitat for the federally-threatened Western snowy plover at Abbotts Lagoon. Exotic plants have taken over significant sections of coastal dune habitat at the Seashore, and park staff have been working for the past several years to turn back the tide on this invasion. Using hand tools, invasive nonnative European beachgrass and iceplant have been removed from over 30-acres of rare coastal dune habitat. Restoration project biologists work closely with biologists from the Point Reyes Bird Observatory. This project has significantly benefited several rare species in addition to the plover, including a small annual wildflower, beach layia, and the perennial Tidestrom’s lupine.

Starting October 25, equipment will be working south of Abbotts Lagoon to treat a 5-acre section of dense beachgrass. Workers will be on site through November 19 clearing out large sections to create snowy plover habitat before the breeding season starts in March. This project is supported through funding from the Cape Mohican oil spill recovery plan, and should result in restoration of 20-acres of habitat by the fall of 2005.

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Fog-filled valley with yellow twilight glow over a ridge in the background. © John B. Weller.

The rich, lush environment of Point Reyes heavily depends on the fog. During rainless summers, fog can account for 1/3 of the ecosystem's water input. But recent studies have indicated that there has been about a 30 percent reduction in fog during the last 100 years here in coastal California. More...