• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

Another Successful Rare-Plant-A-Thon!

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Date: July 24, 2002
Contact: Michelle Coppoletta, 415-464-5242

Over the weekend of July 13 and 14, forty-seven volunteers joined park staff to participate in our fourth Point Reyes "Rare-Plant-A-Thon". Our volunteers had a wide diversity of experience and included Americorp volunteers, members of the GGNRA Habitat Restoration Team, university professors, and even a nine year old "junior botanist." Aside from simply enjoying the Seashore, our volunteers accomplished quite a bit over the course of the weekend. Here are some of the highlights:

* 10 unrecorded rare plant populations were located and documented! A few of these were new documented occurrences of two recent additions to the Seashore - the endangered Robust Spineflower (Chorizanthe robusta) and the Coast morning glory (Calystegia purpurata ssp saxicola).

* One population of the Endangered Tidestrom's lupine (Lupinus tidestromii) was censused and mapped.

* Two known rare plant population's boundaries were extended beyond their originally mapped area.

Once again, the "Rare-Plant-A-Thon" has demonstrated that you can't walk far in Point Reyes without encountering some sort of rare plant species! A heartfelt thank you to all those who gave their time and expertise to help Point Reyes.

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Bubblegum coral. Image courtesy of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute.

On the Cordell Bank, just 32 kilometers (20 miles) to the west of Point Reyes, there are deep-water corals that are 10 to 15 meters (33 to 50 feet) high and estimated to be over 1500 years old. More...