• Pipe Spring National Monument

    Pipe Spring

    National Monument Arizona

Devil's Claw

devil's claw 
devil's claw plant  
devil's claw baskets

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What: The strange looking object is the seed pod of a plant. The plant is known as devil's claw or unicorn plant. It grows in the wild, but sometimes is cultivated for its products. The young green pods are edible when they are still soft. As the pod matures, it becomes stiffer. The pod dries and the skin falls off. As it falls off, the two claws become separate. The seeds inside are edible, too.

The important part of the devil's claw pod is the black fiber. It is strong and does not need to be dyed. It was used to make patterns in baskets. It was sometimes used at the base of the basket and around the edges to make them more durable.

Who: Native Americans used the devil's claw. The baskets seen at the left were made by a Kaibab Paiute tribe member.

Did You Know?

James Whitmore, and the Pipe Spring Longhorns of today, Whit and Tess

James Whitmore brought 400 longhorns with him from Texas to Utah in the 1850s. On April 13, 1863, Whitmore received a land certificate for a 160-acre tract, which included Pipe Spring.