• Pipe Spring National Monument

    Pipe Spring

    National Monument Arizona

Frequently Asked Questions

1. What is Pipe Spring and what can we see here?
Pipe Spring is a water source in the desert that has been used by humans for thousands of years, and the site of an historic cattle ranch established in 1870. Several stone buildings from the pioneer era remain, including a fortified ranch house called Winsor Castle. A new cultural museum displays Native American and pioneer exhibits. An orchard, garden, farm animals, ponds, Kaibab Paiute Indian camp and 1/2 mile trail are also on the site.

2. Who built Winsor Castle and why?
Winsor Castle, named after Anson P. Winsor (the first superintendent of the ranch), was built by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to be a tithing cattle ranch.

3. What Indian tribe is associated with Pipe Spring?
The reservation of the Kaibab Band of Paiute Indians surrounds the national monument. Their story is told in the cultural museum.

4. How long will it take to see Pipe Spring?
A tour of Winsor Castle takes about a half hour. Allow a half hour to an hour to browse the cultural museum. A hike on the beautiful Rim Trail will add another 30 minutes to your visit.

5. How far is it to Winsor Castle?
Approximately 150 yards (5 minute walk) from the Visitor Center to Winsor Castle.

6. What is the Arizona Strip?
It is the northwest portion of Arizona that is separated from the rest of the state by the Grand Canyon.

7. How long has Pipe Spring been administered by the National Park Service?
Pipe Spring has been a National Monument since May 31, 1923.

8. What time zone is Pipe Spring in?
Mountain Standard year-round. The state of Arizona does not observe Daylight Savings time. In the summer, we’re an hour earlier than Utah.

9. Where are the restrooms?
At the Visitor Center, two doors to the left of the front entrance.

10. How many people visit Pipe Spring?
Approximately 55,000 each year.

Did You Know?

Deseret Alphabet

On January 19, 1854, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints adopted the Deseret alphabet. The new alphabet consisted of 38 to 40 characters and was developed mostly by George D. Watt. It was an attempt to help simplify spelling in the English Language.