• Ice crystals form on ground vegetation

    Noatak

    National Preserve Alaska

Frequently Asked Questions

What designations are associated with Noatak National Preserve?

Biosphere Reserve - 1976
National Preserve - December 2, 1980
National Monument - December 1, 1978

Where can I camp in Noatak National Preserve and do I need a permit?
Visitors may generally camp anywhere on NPS lands as long as they do not damage resources. No camping permit is required. There are no developed campsites – all camping is backcountry camping. Visitors are reminded that cabins, tent frames, fish racks and other improvements are usually indications of private lands. Please respect these sites and avoid trespassing.

Can I hunt in Noatak National Preserve?
Hunting is allowed in Noatak National Preserve. All hunters are required to follow state and federal regulations for unit # 23. State regulations are available at www.adfg.state.ak.us. Federal regulations are available at http://alaska.fws.gov/asm.

Who can take me on a trip in the preserve?
Any businesses, such as guides and transporters operating in the preserve, must have a current permit from the National Park Service. Please refer to the current list of commercial use authorizations for a choice of service providers.

Is there lodging available in Noatak National Preserve?
There are no accommodations or public facilities within the preserve. Backcountry camping is the only way to spend the night. Campers must provide their own gear.

Are there any endangered species in Noatak National Preserve?
There are no threatened or endangered species listed for the preserve.

Can I conduct research in the preserve?
All research proposals on National Park Service land need to be reviewed by park staff before a permit is granted. To learn more or get started on the application process, visit the following website: https://science1.nature.nps.gov/research/ac/ResearchIndex

How many people visit Noatak National Preserve each year?
Statistics on visitor use and population are collected throughout the year. Many “visitors” are local residents traveling through the preserve for subsistence activities. Since there is no entrance gate collecting data on this population, the visitor statistics for this group are an estimate. Information is available through the following website: http://www2.nature.nps.gov/stats/

Is there a fee to get in the preserve?
Noatak National Preserve does not have an entrance gate, nor does it collect any fees to travel or camp in the preserve.

Where can I get my official passport stamp for the preserve?
Passport stamps are available at the National Park Service offices in Kotzebue and Nome. The stamps are also available at the Innaigvik Education and Information Center in Kotzebue during the summer. The staff in Kotzebue and Nome can also mail a stamped paper to your postal address if you are unable to visit any of the offices.

When are the mosquitoes really active?
June and July seem to be the best months for mosquitoes. Birds and other insect eaters are fat and happy, but people are usually less enthusiastic. Plan to cover up or use repellant. Typically, there are fewer insects of all kinds in August and September.

When is a good time to float the Noatak River?
June may be too early – the river may still be frozen. July, August and early September are preferable. Be cautious about ice forming on the river by mid to late September. Ice break up and freeze up times can vary, so pay close attention to weather data before and during your trip.

Did You Know?

A mother and baby Dall Sheep stand on a rocky hillside.

Noatak National Preserve provides critical habitat for one of the most northern populations of Dall sheep in the world. The coastal Inupiat word for Dall sheep is Imnaiq; the Kobuk dialect word is Ipnaiq