• Mount Rainier peeks through clouds, viewed across subalpine wildflowers and glacial moraine.

    Mount Rainier

    National Park Washington

Skyline Trail

Trail route of the Skyline Trail beginning at Paradise.
A map of the Skyline Trail route from Paradise. Use of a topographic map of the area is recommended.
 

Trail Description:

Distance, round-trip:

5.5 miles

Elevation gain:

1700 feet

Hiking time, round-trip:

4 hours

Wilderness camps:

None

Note: Check current trail conditions before starting this hike. Early season hiking on this trail may be hazardous. Rest on benches or rocks. Please do not sit or walk on delicate subalpine plants.



The trailhead is located near the entrance to the Jackson Visitor Center at Paradise, marked by stone steps inscribed with a quote by John Muir.

Hiking the loop clockwise, the trail climbs 2 miles until reaching Panorama Point, where a toilet is provided for hikers. Past Panorama Point the trail begins its one mile descent to the junction with the Golden Gate Trail. Another 0.75 mile and the Skyline Trail reaches the Stevens-Van Trump Memorial and its junction with the Paradise Glacier Trail. From there it descends into the Paradise Valley, then climbs slightly to Myrtle Falls and finally back to Paradise.

For a shorter version of this loop, take the Golden Gate Trail back to Paradise.


Along the Trail:


The trail offers stunning displays of subalpine wildflowers, a close-up look at Mount Rainier and the Nisqually Glacier, and, on a clear day, views of peaks as far south as Oregon's Mount Hood.


Backpacking:


Several sections of the park are designated as open to day use only. These areas have been closed to overnight camping due to previous resource damage caused by concentrations of people in areas too fragile to sustain such use. Paradise is a day use only area. Please hike only on the constructed trails and help minimize impact on this delicate environment. Current trail conditions are available at park-wide from wilderness information centers, ranger stations, and visitor centers. Treat water before drinking. Fires are prohibited. No pets on trails.

Did You Know?

Gobblers Knob fire lookout.

In the early 1930s the Civilian Conservation Corp constructed fire lookouts throughout the park to help protect the surrounding area from fire. Four historic lookouts still remain in the Mount Rainier National Historic Landmark District including Tolmie, Shriner, Fremont, and Gobblers Knob.