• Students at South Peak

    Marsh - Billings - Rockefeller

    National Historical Park Vermont

Frost, Dickinson, and WUHS students in Dialogue on the Trail

December 13, 2012 Posted by: K Robbins

What would Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson, and a 10th grade student from Woodstock Union High School talk about if they came together in conversation? Come to this year's Trek to Taste event on June 2 and find out!

Martha Perkins' American Lit students have been studying the poetry of Robert Frost and Emily Dickinson with a goal of learning to trust in his or her own mind to play with the imagery, diction, syntax and punctuation a poet presents in order to make meaning or sense of the truth a poet conveys via his/her poem. In addition to learning about the poets individually, students have been thinking about how these poets might converse with each other.

As a means of putting these poets in dialogue, students visited the park to explore how place can influence conversations and reveal understandings about an individual's interior, spiritual, or private aspects of being. They roamed the trails to pick out places that inspired them or somehow connected to the poetry they'd been studying. In these spots, students wrote, reflected, and photographed.

The next stage in the process will involve students creating their own 're-vision', or 20th century version of the Frost and Dickinson poems they have chosen to work with and juxtaposing the three in a chosen location at the National Park. Finally, students will create a tour of the poems that they will be on hand to guide visitors through during Trek to Taste.

Ultimately, through this project, we hope the students begin to understand how on one level, stewardship and sustainability are about an individual's ability to be in some kind of "dialogue" with the Natural World.

Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson, Poetry, stewardship, sustainability, dialogue, trails




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Did You Know?

In this sepia-toned photo from 1927, nine men sit and kneel amongst the ruins of a Native American dwelling at Mesa Verde. NPS Photo.

As a teenager, Laurance S. Rockefeller toured Yellowstone, Grand Canyon, and Mesa Verde with Horace Albright. Later in life, Laurance would donate lands to create Virgin Islands NP and Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller NHP. He was the first conservationist to receive the Congressional Gold Medal.