• Glacier in Kenai Fjords National Park

    Kenai Fjords

    National Park Alaska

June 2012 Weather Summary

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Date: July 9, 2012
Contact: Deb Kurtz, (907) 422-0544

June in Kenai Fjords is normally the driest month of the year. It is likely that this year will be no exception since June was particularly dry in 2012. As recorded at the Seward airport, total precipitation for the month was 1.59 inches (66% of normal), 0.83 inches below the June average. The monthly average temperature was 50.9 degrees F; 1.3 degrees F below the 30-year June average (1981-2010). The highest wind gusts of the month were recorded on both June 7th and 10th when the Seward airport recorded maximum wind gusts of 35 mph. June 8th had the fastest sustained winds of the month as recorded at the Seward airport with an average wind speed of 12.9 mph.

If Seward's temperatures were too cool for you in June, you could have headed out into the park where temperatures soared higher than in town. The warmest day recorded at the Seward airport was June 29th when the maximum temperature reached 68° F. Temperatures recorded at the Exit Glacier SNOTEL station exceeded this temperature three times, with a maximum temperature of 78° F recorded on June 24th. Two of the NPS Remote Automated Weather Stations (RAWS) located in the park also recorded maximum temperatures for the month that exceeded the Seward airport high. These stations, located on the northern end of the Harding Icefield and on a ridge near Pedersen Lagoon in Aialik Bay, recorded a high of 70° F on June 22nd and June 23rd, respectively.

Also of note:

  • The National Weather Service Climate Prediction Center's three month weather outlook (July-August-September) favors below normal temperatures and normal precipitation for the Kenai Fjords area.
  • The National Snow & Ice Data Center reports that arctic sea ice extent is at a record low level for June.
  • To learn more about temperature and precipitation departures from normal across Alaska this past spring, check out the summer edition of the Alaska Climate Dispatch.
  • Are ocean temperatures dictated by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation driving Alaska's current low salmon returns? Read more…
  • Clear skies on June 6th allowed folks with special sunglasses in Kenai Fjords to view the transit of Venus in front of the Sun. If you missed this event, you can view images of it taken by NASA recorded on June 5-6th.
  • NOAA climate services portal serves as a single point-of-entry for NOAA's extensive climate information, data, products, services, and the climate science magazine ClimateWatch.

More information about the local climate for June 2012

Did You Know?

Hoary Marmot

The Hoary Marmot is the largest member of the ground squirrels. These guys hibernate half or more of their life away. They have very thick fur and a substantial fat layer that protects them from the cold. You are not as likely to see them on hot days as they hide in the shade to keep cool.