• A mid-afternoon veiw down the expanse of Isle Royale National Park.  Photo taken from the Mount Ojibway Fire Tower.

    Isle Royale

    National Park Michigan

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  • Unmanned aircraft including hobbyists

    All waters and lands within the boundary of Isle Royale National Park have been closed to the use of unmanned aircraft including radio-controlled airplanes, hexacopters, and similar items. More »

Wolves - an Ecological Study

The wolves and moose of Isle Royale are known world-wide, and they are the focus of the longest-running study of a predator-prey system in the wild (over 50 years and ongoing). Both species are relatively recent arrivals to Isle Royale -- moose apparently swam to the island and established a population in the early 1900s, and wolves followed decades later after traveling over the ice from Ontario, Canada in the late 1940s. Annual monitoring of wolves and moose began in 1958 when Durward Allen of Purdue University began an ambitious "10-year" study of the wolf-moose relationship. This study continues today, under the direction of John Vucetich and Rolf Peterson of Michigan Technological University. There are several ways to participate in this research; to learn more, click here, and go to "We Need Your Help". At this site you can also find comprehensive information on wolves and moose, and other results from this long-term research.

Did You Know?

Eastern Gray Wolf portrait.

The Ecological Study of Wolves on Isle Royale is the longest running large mammal predator-prey study on earth. The park offers outstanding possibilities for research in a remote, relatively simple ecosystem where overt human influences are limited.