• Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    Indiana Dunes

    National Lakeshore Indiana

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Explore New Miller Woods Trail

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Date: June 3, 2013

INDIANA DUNES NATIONAL LAKESHORE: Miller Woods is known by many local naturalists as one of the hidden gems of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. A recently opened addition to the Miller Woods Trail allows more of this rare dune and swale habitat to be experienced by the public.

This summer, join a park ranger everySundayafternoon at1:30 p.m.for a guided hike on the Miller Woods Trail. Meet at the Paul H. Douglas Center and, if you’re feeling adventurous, hike three miles roundtrip to Lake Michigan and back. The hike begins in an extremely rare oak savanna habitat, now less than 1% of its former range. Species such as red-headed woodpeckers, bottlenose gentians and lady tress orchids may surprise you along the way.

Afterwards, stop by the Douglas Center for the “Family Day” open house. Enjoy family-friendly activities every day during the summer between9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.In addition to lots of indoor activities, like making crafts or feeding the resident fish and turtles, get outside and let the kids enjoy the new Nature Play Zone. The newly opened area, just outside the center, is open for family unstructured play until4:00 p.m.each day. Children can build, dig and create using outdoor materials such as sticks, rakes, buckets and rocks.

The Paul H. Douglas Center is located at 100 North Lake Street in the western part of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. For more information on this or other programs at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, contact the Douglas Center at 219-395-1821 or check the park website at www.nps.gov/indu/planyourvisit.

Did You Know?

Close-up of flames burning a prairie

Without fire, there could be no prairie at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. Non-prairie plant species would crowd out native prairie grasses. These rare grasslands are maintained through periodic controlled burns.