• water flowing over rocks into basin

    Hot Springs

    National Park Arkansas

Nature & Science

 
aerial view of Hot Springs Mountain with the Mountain Tower on the lower left, West Mountain and Music Mountain above the tower and the valley with downtown buildings showing on the right. Photo has a blue hue.

This aerial photo shows how the park and city intertwine.

The thermal springs are the primary natural resource of the park, but they have not been preserved in their unaltered state as natural surface phenomena. They have instead been managed to conserve the production of uncontaminated hot water for public use.

The mountains within the park are also managed within this conservation philosophy in order to preserve the hydrological system that feeds the springs. The park and its surrounding mountains exhibit a south-central United States pine-oak-hickory forest ecosystem. The park's vegetation, thermal waters, cold water springs, bathhouses and associated cultural features, foot trails, prehistoric and historic novaculite quarries, and general physiography combine to form an almost 5400 acre area of resource preservation and interpretation that is under the exclusive legislative jurisdiction of the federal government. Another 672.69 acres are within the park boundary but are not federally owned.

The city of Hot Springs, Arkansas, with an approximate population of 33,000, lies immediately outside the park and exerts a significant influence on it.

 

Hot Springs National Park will be hosting several interns during the summer of 2015 to perform a variety of tasks in the park, including research, observation, control of invasive plant species, and lots more. Here are a few links to programs we are working with on these projects.

George Melendez Wright Young Leaders in Climate Change

Geological Society of America GeoCorps Geoscientists-in-Parks Internship

Geological Society of America GeoCorps Diversity Internship

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