• water flowing over rocks into basin

    Hot Springs

    National Park Arkansas

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  • RFP for Maurice and Libbey Bathhouses

    Requests for Proposals for the Maurice and Libbey Bathhouses are being accepted from 7/7/14 to 1/30/15. Click on the "Management" link in the left column for more information.

  • Elevator closure

    Hot Springs National Park regrets to announce that the elevator in the Fordyce Visitor Center is closed for maintenance. The upper and lower levels are accessible only by stairways. The elevator will be placed back into service in about 4 to 6 weeks.

  • Closure of Happy Hollow Spring Fountain

    Happy Hollow jug fountains, (located on Fountain Street), will be closed Wednesday morning (08/27/14) for maintenance. Hours of closure will be 8:00 til noon.

Maurice Bathhouse

color photo of the Maurice from the north front side. It is a three story white stucco building of the California Modern style with large arched plate glass windows on all sides of the enclosed porch. Center of the roof you can see the skylight cover peaking over the top of the green tiled roof.

The massive Maurice Bathhouse was a close rival of the luxurious Fordyce.

Designed by architect George Gleim, Jr., the present Maurice Bathhouse was built by William (Billy) Maurice to replace an existing Victorian-style building, the Independent Bathhouse, later renamed the Maurice Bathhouse after owner Charles Maurice (William’s father). The present building opened for business on January 1, 1912. With a total floor space of 23,000 square feet, the three-story bathhouse had ample room for a complete range of services and amenities, including a gymnasium, staterooms, a roof garden, twin elevators, and in the 1930s a therapeutic pool, situated in the basement. It was the only bathhouse on the Row to have a pool. The Maurice closed in November 1974.

Read a brief history of the Maurice.
Download Adobe Acrobat Reader for this .pdf file.

Did You Know?

The Lamar Spring and collection pool, with brick walkway surrounding, with steam rising above.

Water emerging from the hot springs in Hot Springs National Park fell as rain when the pyramids of Egypt were built—4400 years ago!