• water flowing over rocks into basin

    Hot Springs

    National Park Arkansas

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • RFP for Maurice and Libbey Bathhouses

    Requests for Proposals for the Maurice and Libbey Bathhouses are being accepted from 7/7/14 to 1/30/15. Click on the "Management" link in the left column for more information.

  • Elevator closure

    Hot Springs National Park regrets to announce that the elevator in the Fordyce Visitor Center is closed for maintenance. The upper and lower levels are accessible only by stairways. The elevator will be placed back into service in about 4 to 6 weeks.

  • Closure of Happy Hollow Spring Fountain

    Happy Hollow jug fountains, (located on Fountain Street), will be closed Wednesday morning (08/27/14) for maintenance. Hours of closure will be 8:00 til noon.

Fordyce Bathhouse

color photo of front of Fordyce Bathhouse from the norht side in front of the hexagonal based fountain. The building is tan and buff colored brick with a losenge pattern. The porch is covered by a copper marquee that has Fordyce Baths in stained glass panels on the overhanging front. All windows have ornate surrounds of glazed terra cotta.

The beautiful Fordyce Bathhouse now houses the Hot Springs National Park Visitor Center

The Fordyce opened March 1, 1915. Designed by Little Rock architects Mann and Stern and constructed under the supervision of owner Sam Fordyce's son John, the building eventually cost over $212,000 to build, equip, and furnish. Totaling approximately 28,000 square feet, the Fordyce is the largest bathhouse on the Row. It has three main floors, two courtyards, and a basement under most of the building. The Fordyce became the first bathhouse on the Row to go out of business when it suspended operations on June 30, 1962, but it was extensively restored by 1989 and is now enjoying a renaissance as a historically furnished museum. It also functions as the park’s visitor center.
Take a peek at some refurnished rooms.

Read a brief history of the Fordyce.
Download Adobe Acrobat Reader for this .pdf file.

Did You Know?

black and white photo of bronze eagle on top of limestone

In 1892 U.S. Army Lt. Robert R. Stevens hired the noted Boston firm of Frederick Law Olmsted to create landscaping plans for Hot Springs Reservation, now Hot Springs National Park. Stevens rejected the firm’s plans in 1893, but some features were adopted and still survive today.