• water flowing over rocks into basin

    Hot Springs

    National Park Arkansas

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • RFP for Maurice and Libbey Bathhouses

    Requests for Proposals for the Maurice and Libbey Bathhouses are being accepted from 7/7/14 to 1/30/15. Click on the "Management" link in the left column for more information.

  • Elevator closure

    Hot Springs National Park regrets to announce that the elevator in the Fordyce Visitor Center is closed for maintenance. The upper and lower levels are accessible only by stairways. The elevator will be placed back into service in about 4 to 6 weeks.

Buckstaff Bathhouse

color photo of Buckstaff, showing the ramp and center front of the building. It is a three story building of grayish-brown brick and white Doric colums with classic urns flanking the top of the ramp and between the third floor windows. It has blue and white striped awnings.

Buckstaff Baths

The Buckstaff Bathhouse, named for controlling shareholders George and Milo Buckstaff, replaced the former Rammelsberg Bathhouse. Designed by Frank W. Gibb and Company, Architects, the present bathhouse cost $125,000 to build and contains 27,000 square feet on three main floors. Because it has been in continuous operation since it opened on February 1, 1912, it is one of the best preserved of all of the bathhouses on Bathhouse Row, but it has undergone many changes over the years. Originally it had a large hydrotherapeutic department. Only it, the Fordyce and the Imperial had these.
Visit the Buckstaff Baths website to find out about taking a bath.

Read a brief history of the Buckstaff.
Download Adobe Acrobat Reader for this .pdf file.

Did You Know?

Team photo of 1913 Boston Red Sox team with inscription

Hot Springs, Arkansas, was the premier baseball spring training site from the 1880s-1940s. The Chicago White Stockings, Cincinnati Reds, Pittsburgh Pirates, Boston Red Sox and others came to soothe their aching muscles at the many bathhouses using Hot Springs National Park water.