• An open vista frames two white grave stone and a flag in the distance with a white cottage in the foreground.

    Herbert Hoover

    National Historic Site Iowa

Recovery Act Funds Rehabilitation of Historic Wright House

Peeling white paint on the wooden siding of a 19th century frame house.
Peeling lead paint on the exterior Wright House will be removed before the house is repainted.
NPS Photo

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News Release Date: October 1, 2009
Contact: Adam Prato, (319) 643-7855

WEST BRANCH, IOWA— Rehabilitation of the historic Wright House, one of the restored buildings at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site, will begin in October. “This project is funded by the Recovery Act passed earlier this year,” said park superintendent Cheryl A. Schreier.

A contractor will remove the deteriorating lead-based exterior paint to mitigate a hazard to employees and visitors. The lead paint removal is part of an ongoing park-wide abatement project that requires the removal of all layers of deteriorated, peeling, and chipping exterior paint. The building materials under the paint will be repaired as needed before the house exterior is brought back to near original condition.

The restored Wright House is part of the historic neighborhood setting of the Herbert Hoover Birthplace Cottage. William Wright, a West Branch businessman, and his wife Mary were the Hoovers’ neighbors during the 1870s when the Hoovers lived in the small, two-room house at the corner of Downey and Penn streets. The Wright House is not open to the public, but is used as housing for seasonal park employees.

Herbert Hoover National Historic Site and the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum are in West Branch, Iowa at exit 254 off I-80. Both are open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Central Time. Parking is limited so please allow extra time to find a parking space.

Did You Know?

Hoover's birthplace as it appeared before restoration: a two-story white frame house.

Herbert Hoover's birthplace was a tourist attraction as early as 1928. Jennie Scellers, the house's owner, charged 10 cents for tours and set up a souvenir stand on her lawn. More...