• Halema`uma`u Just Before Dawn

    Hawai'i Volcanoes

    National Park Hawai'i

Final Count for Humpback Whales from Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park for 2014

Volunteers at Ka‘ena Point
Whale count volunteers in January 2014 at Ka‘ena Point
NPS Photo

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
News Release Date: March 25, 2014
Contact: Jessica Ferracane, 808-985-6018
Contact: Park Ranger Adrian Boone, 808-985-6172

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park encourages volunteers to register to help count humpback whales during the final 2014 Sanctuary Ocean Count held this Saturday, March 29, from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Ka‘ena Point, located near the end of Chain of Craters Road in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, is one of Hawai‘i Island’s 21 Sanctuary Ocean Count sites. It is the first pullout along the ocean, close to the end of the road – about a 45-minute drive from the park entrance. Bring a cushion or chair to sit on, snacks, sun and rain protection. Binoculars are optional. Check in with Sanctuary Ocean Count site leader, Park Ranger Adrian Boone. 

Volunteers on shore monitor humpbacks in nearshore waters for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary. Residents and visitors look forward to this yearly event which provides important population and distribution information about humpback whales around the Hawaiian Islands.

The Sanctuary Ocean Count is an ideal opportunity for the community and the park to work together as stewards of the ocean. These splendid creatures swim more than 2,000 miles to Hawai‘i from Arctic waters every winter, and the annual count is one way to observe and record their behavior and ensure their future. 

For more information, visit www.hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov. To register online, visit www.sanctuaryoceancount.org, or simply show up for all or part of the count. For additional questions, please call the Ocean Count Hotline 808-268-3087.

-NPS-

 
whale tail
A humpback whale shows off its tail in waters off Ka‘ena Point in January 2014.
Photo courtesy of Thomas C. Stein

Did You Know?

Waha`ula Visitor Center surrendering to lava.

From 1983 to 1991, lava flows repeatedly invaded communities on Kīlauea's coastal south flank burying eight miles of highway and destroying 181 houses and a visitor center in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.