• Halema`uma`u Just Before Dawn

    Hawai'i Volcanoes

    National Park Hawai'i

March 2014 Hawaiian Cultural & After Dark in the Park Programs

Lava flows from Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Zone, March 25, 1984
Lava flows erupted from the Northeast Rift Zone of Mauna Loa on March 25, 1984
USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

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News Release Date: February 14, 2014
Contact: Jessica Ferracane, 808-985-6018

Hawaii National Park, Hawai'i – Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in March. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai'i Pacific Parks Association, and your $2 donation helps support park programs.  Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

From Ka'ū to Kona: Stories of Lava Flows and Volcanic Landscapes. While driving between Ka'ū and Kona, have you ever wondered about the prominent lava flows you see along Queen Ka'ahumanu and Māmalahoa Highways? If so, you are invited to join USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists Jim Kauahikaua and Janet Babb on a virtual road trip, during which they will talk about the origin and history of lava flows along Highways 11 and 190, and recount the stories of people impacted by the eruptions that created the volcanic landscape we see today. Part of Hawai'i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., March 4, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

'Ohe Kapala Demonstration. 'Ohe kapala, or bamboo stamps, were utilized to present many unique designs for traditional Hawaiian kapa.  Today, these exceptional designs are being used as patterns on all types of fabric. Join Keiko Mercado as she demonstrates how 'ohe (bamboo) are carved into beautiful designs and how they are used. There will be samples and a hands-on opportunity to learn about this distinctive art form. Part of Hawai'i Volcanoes' ongoing 'Ike Hana No'eau "Experience the Skillful Work" workshops. Free.
When: Wed., March 12 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Ben Ka'ili in Concert. Hawaiian musician Ben Ka'ili has dedicated his life to playing and promoting Hawaiian music. He has shared Hawaiian music at festivals, including the park's 33rd annual cultural festival last July, and through concerts and performances for more than 20 years. Born on the Island of Hawai'i, Ka'ili started playing Hawaiian music at eight years old with his 'ohana, including his uncle, George Lanakilakeikiahiali'i Na'ope. Part of Hawai'i Volcanoes' ongoing Nā Leo Manu "Heavenly Voices" presentations. Free.
When: Wed., March 19 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Mauna Loa: Eruptive History and Current Status of Earth's Largest Active Volcano. March 25, 2014, marks the 30th anniversary of the most recent eruption of Mauna Loa, the largest active volcano on Earth. Mauna Loa comprises more than half of the surface area of Hawai'i Island, and 95 percent of this volcano is covered with lava flows less than 10,000 years old. Since 1843, Mauna Loa has erupted 33 times – and when it erupts, fast-moving and voluminous lava flows can reach the ocean in a matter of hours, severing roads and utilities, repaving the flanks of the volcano, and building new land. Join USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Frank Trusdell as he talks about the eruptive history and current status of Mauna Loa, an active volcano that will undoubtedly erupt again—perhaps in your lifetime. Part of Hawai'i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., March 25, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Uhana Lauhala. Learn to weave a star from leaves of the pandanus tree. Join members of 'Aha Pūhala o Puna as they share the art of lauhala weaving to perpetuate this Hawaiian art. Part of Hawai'i Volcanoes' ongoing 'Ike Hana No'eau "Experience the Skillful Work" workshops. Free.
When: Wed., March 26 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Ripe `ohelo berries ready to be eaten by nene.

`Ohelo (Vaccinium reticulatum) is a relative of blueberries and a favorite food of nene, the Hawaiian Goose. Its berries range from dark red to pale yellow when ripe and are sacred to Pele, the volcano deity.