• Halema`uma`u Just Before Dawn

    Hawai'i Volcanoes

    National Park Hawai'i

Help Free Forest of Faya

Invasive Faya
Morella faya (also known as fire tree, firetree and faya bush) is on the Hawai`i State Noxious Weed List and is considered very invasive
Jay Robinson

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News Release Date: February 12, 2011
Contact: Friends of Hawai`i Volcanoes national Park, 808-985-7373

Time: 8:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

"This month we will work in the Keanakakoi Special Ecological Area removing invasive, non-native faya plants that have grown since the park cleared the area a few years ago. Some faya are seedlings that pull easily; most are maturing trees that we will cut with saws," says Patty Kupchak, co-chair of FHVNP’s Forest Restoration Committee.

"Keanakakoi has a wonderful ‘ohi‘a forest with a nice variety of native under-story plants and cindery soil. We’ll also learn about the park’s native forest restoration program and control of invasive plants in Special Ecological Areas," she adds.

FHVNP seeks a crew of 16 people, and pre-registration is required. All participants will need to sign a Friends release form. An adult will need to be present to co-sign a park volunteer form for those under 18.

"Volunteers should be at least 14 years old, and be able to hike at least one mile over uneven terrain and through some areas of dense brush," Kupchak notes. "Also imperative is thescrubbing the soles of one’s shoes prior to arrival on site, in order to ensure outside dirt and invasive species seeds aren't tracked in."

Sturdy walking shoes and long pants are required, along with gear for variable weather conditions (be prepared for sun or rain with a hat, raincoat, sunscreen, etc.) plus drinking water, snacks, and a bag lunch.

To register for the February 12 "Forest Restoration Project," please call the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park at 985-7373 or email forest@fhvnp.org. Instructions on where to meet will be provided upon registration. More details at www.fhvnp.org.

Did You Know?

`a`a flowing over an older flow of pahoehoe.

The two types of Hawaiian lava differ in appearance but are chemically alike. Pahoehoe has a smoother and ropey surface where a`a is jagged and clinkery.