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    Hawai'i Volcanoes

    National Park Hawai'i

Controlled Burn Planned Friday at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park

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Date: August 18, 2011
Contact: Jessica Ferracane, 808-985-6011 or 808-895-5740

Hawaiʻi National Park, HI - The fire management team at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is planning a controlled burn at Kealakomowaena on Fri., Aug. 19, near the bottom of Chain of Craters Road.

The 130-acre burn will regenerate the growth of native pili grass and other indigenous plant species, as well as maintain a cultural landscape once occupied by families living in the Kealakomo ahupuaʻa. There are no closures planned, and park visitors and normal park activities will not be impacted.

Kealakomowaena is an island of vegetation, or kīpuka, spared by recent lava flows in the middle of the Kealakomo ahupuaʻa. Hawaiians thrived in this coastal lowland area, growing sweet potatoes, harvesting fish and drying salt. House sites, trails, lava rock walls and agricultural plots are found throughout Kealakomowaena. The controlled burn will be done in a manner to help maintain the traditional landscape of the area.

Controlled burning is part of a comprehensive restoration plan for the coastal lowland ecosystem at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. Historically, controlled fire in this area has proved beneficial in reducing the dominant alien woody plant and grass species, allowing park resource managers to plant seeds of native species and reintroduce the pili grassland system.

An eight-person fire crew will administer the controlled burn, expected to last all day Friday. There will be a pullout along Chain of Craters Road at the top of the Hōlei Pali where park visitors may stop and watch the controlled burn taking place throughout the day.

"These types of prescribed burns are beneficial as they fortify the cultural landscape by stimulating the growth of native vegetation," said Fire Management Officer Joe Molhoek.

Did You Know?

The Kamehameha Butterfly is orange and black, with white spots.

Only two butterflies found in Hawai`i are native. The Kamehameha Butterfly (Vanessa tameamea) is Hawai`i's state insect, brightly colored, and larger than the Blackburn's blue (Udara blackburni).