• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Area closure in effect for trails in the Jenny Lake Area

    A temporary area closure will be in effect for several trails in the Jenny Lake area due to construction activities involving helicopter-assisted transport of heavy material. The closure will last from October 27 through October 30, and possibly longer. More »

  • Multi-use Pathway Closures

    Intermittent closures of the park Multi-use Pathway System will occur through mid-October during asphalt sealing and safety improvement work. Pathway sections will reopen as work is completed. Follow the link for a map and more information. More »

  • Moose-Wilson Road Status

    The Moose-Wilson Road between the Death Canyon Road and the Murie Center Road is currently open to all traffic. The road may re-close at any time due to wildlife activity. For current road conditions call 307-739-3682. More »

Prevent Aquatic Nuisance Species

Stop Aquatic Nuisance Species logo

New for 2010: Wyoming state law now requires boaters to purchase an Aquatic Invasive Species decal from the Wyoming Game and Fish Department and post it on their boat. more>>

All boaters recreating in Grand Teton National Park must self-certify that your boat is aquatic nuisance free. More>>



Download the Pocket Guide: Aquatic Nuisance Species handbook for photos, descriptions and useful information.



Aquatic Nuisance Species Pose a Serious Threat to the Aquatic Ecosystem



DRAIN - CLEAN - DRY





Aquatic invasive species, such as whirling disease and zebra or quagga mussels, are a serious ecological and economic threat to the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Any activities that come in contact with any body of water have the potential to spread non-native plants, pathogens, and other invasive species among water bodies. Follow these steps every time you come in contact with any body of water:





1. Remove all visible mud, plants, fish, or other tiny animals from your boats, trailers, and other equipment, including waders, boots, clothing, and nets.



2. Eliminate water from all equipment before transporting anywhere. Much of the recreational equipment used in water contains spots where water can collect and potentially harbor these aquatic hitchhikers. Drain your boat hull and live well in a safe location (a flat paved, dirt, or gravel area) away from all park surface waters.



3. Clean and dry everything that comes in contact with water before entering a new body of water. It is best to use high-pressure, hot water (available at car washes outside the park) to clean your boat, trailer, and gear.



4. Dry Equipment. If possible, allow 5 days of drying time before entering new waters.

Did You Know?

Pronghorn

Did you know that pronghorns are the fastest mammals in the western hemisphere? They can run up to 70 mph, but do not like to jump fences! In the summer, pronghorn live along Antelope Flats Road, but in fall they migrate almost 200 miles to central Wyoming.