• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Seasonal road closures in effect

    Seasonal road closures are in effect for motorized vehicles. The Teton Park Road is closed from the Taggart Lake Trailhead to the Signal Mountain Lodge. The Moose-Wilson Road is closed from the Granite Canyon Trailhead to the Death Canyon Road. More »

  • Avalanche hazards exist in the park

    Avalanche hazards exist in the park, especially in mountain canyons and on exposed slopes. A daily avalanche forecast can be found at www.jhavalanche.org or by calling (307) 733-2664. More »

  • Bears emerging from hibernation

    Bears are beginning to emerge from hibernation. Travel in groups of three of more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay at least 100 yards from bears. More »

Prevent Aquatic Nuisance Species

Stop Aquatic Nuisance Species logo

New for 2010: Wyoming state law now requires boaters to purchase an Aquatic Invasive Species decal from the Wyoming Game and Fish Department and post it on their boat. more>>

All boaters recreating in Grand Teton National Park must self-certify that your boat is aquatic nuisance free. More>>



Download the Pocket Guide: Aquatic Nuisance Species handbook for photos, descriptions and useful information.



Aquatic Nuisance Species Pose a Serious Threat to the Aquatic Ecosystem



DRAIN - CLEAN - DRY





Aquatic invasive species, such as whirling disease and zebra or quagga mussels, are a serious ecological and economic threat to the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Any activities that come in contact with any body of water have the potential to spread non-native plants, pathogens, and other invasive species among water bodies. Follow these steps every time you come in contact with any body of water:





1. Remove all visible mud, plants, fish, or other tiny animals from your boats, trailers, and other equipment, including waders, boots, clothing, and nets.



2. Eliminate water from all equipment before transporting anywhere. Much of the recreational equipment used in water contains spots where water can collect and potentially harbor these aquatic hitchhikers. Drain your boat hull and live well in a safe location (a flat paved, dirt, or gravel area) away from all park surface waters.



3. Clean and dry everything that comes in contact with water before entering a new body of water. It is best to use high-pressure, hot water (available at car washes outside the park) to clean your boat, trailer, and gear.



4. Dry Equipment. If possible, allow 5 days of drying time before entering new waters.

Did You Know?

Tetons from the north, photo by Erin Himmel

Did you know that a large fault lies at the base of the Teton Range? Every few thousand years earthquakes up to a magnitude of 7.5 on the Richter Scale signal movement on the Teton fault, lifting the mountains skyward and hinging the valley floor downward.