• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Area closure in effect for trails in the Jenny Lake Area

    A temporary area closure will be in effect for several trails in the Jenny Lake area due to construction activities involving helicopter-assisted transport of heavy material. The closure will last from October 27 through October 30, and possibly longer. More »

  • Multi-use Pathway Closures

    Intermittent closures of the park Multi-use Pathway System will occur through mid-October during asphalt sealing and safety improvement work. Pathway sections will reopen as work is completed. Follow the link for a map and more information. More »

  • Moose-Wilson Road Status

    The Moose-Wilson Road between the Death Canyon Road and the Murie Center Road is currently open to all traffic. The road may re-close at any time due to wildlife activity. For current road conditions call 307-739-3682. More »

Scoping Begins for Mountain Goat Management Plan EA

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Date: November 12, 2013
Contact: Public Affairs Office, 307.739.3393

The National Park Service is beginning to develop a plan to analyze potential strategies for managing non-native mountain goats in Grand Teton National Park and the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway. This management plan and environmental assessment (plan/EA) would support long-term protection for the mountain ecosystem and its associated native species in Grand Teton and the JDR Parkway.  Public comments will be accepted during a scoping period from November 12 through December 13, 2013. 

A plan/EA is needed to address the impacts of non-native mountain goats which could include the loss or alteration of native ecosystems, especially native plant and animal communities, and effects on bighorn sheep, a native species of conservation concern. Primary reasons for evaluating management actions, which may involve potential removal of mountain goats from park lands, include: Resource damage; use of limited natural resources (habitat and food); competition with a small, genetically isolated population of native bighorn sheep; and potential risk of disease transmission to bighorn sheep. 

Mountain goats currently found in the Teton Range are colonizers from herds that developed after goats were transplanted by the Idaho Fish and Game Department into the Snake River Range and Big Hole Mountains of southeastern Idaho beginning in 1969. These areas are about 20 miles from the southwest boundary of Grand Teton. Although mountain goats are native to northern mountain ranges in the western United States, including some in northern Idaho and Montana, the southeast Idaho transplant locations were outside their historical range. Within a decade, goats were occasionally seen in the Teton Range, however sightings were sporadic and the animals appeared transient. 

Since 2008, park biologists have documented groups of mountain goats including nannies (adult females) with kids (young of the year) annually within Grand Teton National Park. These observations strongly suggest that goats are in the early stages of establishing a population in the Teton Range. Goat activity has primarily been concentrated in the Cascade Canyon area of the Tetons, but recent sightings have occurred throughout the mountain range.  

To obtain information and submit comments, visit online at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/mountaingoat. Comments may also be submitted to Grand Teton National Park; Planning & Environmental Compliance; P.O. Drawer 170; Moose, WY 83012.

Did You Know?

Bill Menors Ferry

Did you know that until the 1890s no one had settled on the west bank of the Snake River in the central part of Jackson Hole? William “Bill” Menor built a ferry at Moose to shuttle patrons across the river, the only reliable crossing point between Wilson and Moran.