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    Grand Teton

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Invitation to Participate in “A Nickel for the Barn” Public Art Show

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T.A. Moulton Barn on Mormon Row Turns 100 this year.

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Date: June 26, 2013
Contact: Public Affairs Office, 307.739.3393

Grand Teton National Park has partnered with the Jackson Hole Historical Society & Museum (JHHSM) and the T.A. Moulton Barn Centennial Celebration committee to stage a public art exhibition titled "A Nickel for the Barn." Artists, poets, and photographers of all ages, abilities and disciplines are invited to participate in this public art show centered on the T.A. Moulton barn and history of Mormon Row.  Submitted artwork will be displayed from July 2-21 at the JHHSM building on North Cache in Jackson and from July 22-August 4 at the Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center in Moose.   

T.A. Moulton's son, Clark, used to say, "If I had a nickel for every picture that was taken of that barn, I'd be rich." As the Moulton Barn reaches its 100th anniversary, it's time to test that theory. The famous barn, a prominent feature of the Mormon Row historic district in Grand Teton National Park, is showing signs of age and is in need of preservation work, ranging from emergency stabilization to window repair.  Artists are encouraged to take the challenge and create a piece of art that supports restoration of the barn, or just submit a piece of original art that pays tribute to the legacy of the Mormon Row area. 

Artwork submissions must be received on July 1st from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the JHHSM building at 225 North Cache Street in Jackson, Wyoming.  An opening reception will take place on July 3rd from 7-9 p.m. 

The Historical Museum will divide their gallery space into two-foot by two-foot squares, creating a floor-to-ceiling grid on which artists can hang their work, in any chosen medium. Artists are required to donate 30% of any and all sales, and the proceeds will go directly to a T.A. Moulton Barn Centennial Preservation Fund, to be administered by the Grand Teton National Park Foundation. 

To display their work depicting facets of Mormon Row, artists may purchase as many squares as they wish for $10 each.  Artists may also use their squares however they wish, and can install one piece of art (or more) in a single square, or combine several squares to install a larger piece.   

Pieces on exhibit can be available for purchase or simply submitted for display. Artists can choose to pick up their work that does not sell on July 22nd by 6 p.m., or they can choose to have their piece transported to the Craig Thomas Visitor Center in Grand Teton National Park to remain on display and for sale for an additional two weeks. Artists who chose to display in both locations will be required to pick up their work on August 5th by 6 p.m. at the Discovery Center. 

For further information about this community art challenge and exhibition, call the Jackson Hole Historical Society & Museum at 733.9605 or visit online at http://www.themoultonbarn.com/art-show-2/.

Did You Know?

Beaver Dick Leigh and his family.

Did you know that Jenny and Leigh Lakes are named for the fur trapper “Beaver” Dick Leigh and his wife Jenny (not pictured)? Beaver Dick and Jenny assisted the Hayden party that explored the region in 1872. This couple impressed the explorers to the extent that they named the lakes in their honor.