• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Area closure in effect for trails in the Jenny Lake Area

    A temporary area closure will be in effect for several trails in the Jenny Lake area due to construction activities involving helicopter-assisted transport of heavy material. The closure will last from October 27 through October 30, and possibly longer. More »

  • Multi-use Pathway Closures

    Intermittent closures of the park Multi-use Pathway System will occur through mid-October during asphalt sealing and safety improvement work. Pathway sections will reopen as work is completed. Follow the link for a map and more information. More »

  • Moose-Wilson Road Status

    The Moose-Wilson Road between the Death Canyon Road and the Murie Center Road is currently open to all traffic. The road may re-close at any time due to wildlife activity. For current road conditions call 307-739-3682. More »

Rangers Investigate Death of Mule Deer with Atypical Antlers

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: January 10, 2013
Contact: Public Affairs Office, 307.739.3393

Grand Teton National Park rangers, with assistance from the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, conducted an investigation into the recent death of a buck mule deer. The mule deer died as a result of physical injuries sometime on Tuesday, January 8, 2013 along the Gros Ventre River near the park's southern boundary. While the natural death of an animal inside of a national park can be expected, this individual deer wore an atypical set of antlers that brought particular attention and admiration from visitors and local residents alike, and therefore prompted this announcement about the circumstances of its death. 

Park rangers were well aware of this unusual buck deer, and they regularly saw it on their routine patrols. On December 28, the buck appeared to be injured. Consequently for the next 10 days, rangers tracked its movements more consistently. The deer bedded down near the Gros Ventre River on Monday, January 7, and apparently died sometime the next day. 

The ensuing investigation by Grand Teton National Park and the Wyoming Game and Fish Department determined that some time ago, the deer suffered a broken bone in the lower portion of its front leg. An infection developed causing further damage to the deer's hoof. This significantly compromised the health of the animal and was the essential factor in its death on Tuesday. The investigation also revealed that none of the mule deer's injuries were consistent with a gunshot wound. 

Due to the unique nature of the buck's antlers, Grand Teton National Park will consider preserving its head and antlers for appropriate educational display.

 
Gros Ventre Buck 4 (1)
Mule Deer with Atypical Antlers Died in GTNP
photo: Park Ranger Chris Valdez, GTNP

Did You Know?

Tetons from Hurricane Pass, KF

Did you know that Grand Teton National Park was established in both 1929 and 1950? The original 1929 park protected the mountain peaks and the lakes near the base. The boundaries were later expanded in 1950 to include much of the adjacent valley floor.