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    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

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Michael Coleman Bronze Sculpture Donated to Grand Teton National Park

Moose Sculpture
Bronze sculpture of bull moose attracts kids.

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News Release Date: August 5, 2011
Contact: Jackie Skaggs, 307.739.3393

August 5, 2011

11-65

Grand Teton National Park Superintendent Mary Gibson Scott is pleased to announce that a bronze sculpture of a mature bull moose was recently donated to the park by two members of the Grand Teton National Park Foundation, Steve and Roberta Denning. The statuesque moose stands near the courtyard of the Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center and serves as a symbolic ambassador for Grand Teton as it greets visitors from near and far.

Thanks to the Denning's generous donation, park visitors are charmed by a realistic replica of one of the park's most iconic animals. Titled 'September' by American artist Michael Coleman, the life-size moose sculpture stands over nine feet tall at its antlers. This imposing sculpture has quickly become a fascinating attraction for kids and adults alike. Many visitors stop to snap a photograph standing next to the bronze moose before they venture into the visitor center.

The Dennings donated the statue through the Grand Teton National Park Foundation, the park's primary fundraising partner. With one hundred percent funding by Foundation donors, a new state-of-the-art auditorium was recently added to the Discovery Center and dedicated on July 6.

As the 'September' moose sculpture continues to be a popular attraction for visitors, it seems only fitting that it resides in Moose, Wyoming at the Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center: a facility that the Foundation was instrumental in helping to fund and open in 2007.

"It's been fun to watch the reactions and expressions of kids, teenagers and adults when they come face to face with the life-size moose sculpture," said Superintendent Scott. "The Dennings have given the park and its visitors a unique and enduring gift. Their donation will likely provide not only photographic memories, but also a greater appreciation for native wildlife. This moose sculpture also offers visitors a great opportunity to view one of the park's largest animals at close range, in complete safety." 

Did You Know?

Beaver Dick Leigh and his family.

Did you know that Jenny and Leigh Lakes are named for the fur trapper “Beaver” Dick Leigh and his wife Jenny (not pictured)? Beaver Dick and Jenny assisted the Hayden party that explored the region in 1872. This couple impressed the explorers to the extent that they named the lakes in their honor.