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    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Moose-Wilson Road Closure

    The Moose-Wilson Road between Death Canyon Junction north to the intersection with the Murie Center Road is temporarily closed to motor vehicles, bicycles, skating, skateboards and similar devices. For current road conditions call 307-739-3682. More »

  • Pathway Closure

    The Multi-use Pathway will be closed from the Gros Ventre Bridge to the Snake River Bridge starting on September 15, 2014 due to construction. Construction on this section of pathway is expected to be completed by October 13, 2014.

Critically Injured Hiker Rescued from the Ellingwood Couloir on Middle Teton

Helicopter Haymaker Rescue
Teton Interagency contract helicopter lifts off enroute to rescue Haymaker from Middle Teton.

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News Release Date: July 29, 2011
Contact: Jackie Skaggs, 307.739.3393

July 29, 2011

11-62

Grand Teton National Park rangers rescued a 20-year-old hiker, who took a tumbling 1,200-foot fall just after 10:30 a.m. on Friday, July 29 and sustained critical injuries. Ryan Haymaker of Houston, Texas was glissading down the Ellingwood Couloir on the south side of the Middle Teton when he lost control and hit a rock causing him to flip over and continue head first down the couloir.

A bystander, who witnessed the fall and was nearby, called 911 to report the incident. The 911 call went to the sheriff's office in Rexburg, Idaho, and they transferred the call to Teton Interagency Dispatch Center at 10:43 a.m. Three park rangers were flown by a Teton Interagency contract helicopter to a landing zone near Haymaker's location at the bottom of the Ellingwood Couloir. A fourth ranger was flown to the scene shortly after the initial three, and the rangers provided emergency medical care before preparing Haymaker for a helicopter flight to the valley floor.

Haymaker was loaded into the ship and flown to the Lupine Meadows Rescue Cache, where he was met by a team of emergency medical providers led by Dr. Will Smith, one of the co-medical directors for Grand Teton National Park. Haymaker was stabilized at the rescue cache, and then flown directly on an Air Idaho life flight to the Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center (EIRMC) in Idaho Falls, Idaho at 1:40 p.m.

Haymaker and his companion had glissaded about one-third of the way down the couloir when the incident occurred. Haymaker was glissading behind his companion when he picked up speed and passed him; shortly after, he hit the first series of rocks. Haymaker did not have a helmet at the time of the incident. Although he was carrying an ice axe and wearing crampons, he was unable to right himself or self arrest.

While Haymaker is from Houston, he has been working seasonally in Jackson Hole.

Rangers remind visitors that snow persists above 9,000 feet. Backcountry users should be in good physical condition and stick to hikes and routes that are within their ability and comfort levels. Appropriate equipment, and the knowledge of how to use it, are essential for a safe trip. Hikers, climbers, and skiers should also note that most accidents involve slips on snow or ice and most often occur on the descent at the end of the day.

Backcountry users are advised to stop in or call a visitor center or ranger station on the day of travel to obtain the most current rail, route and snow conditions.

Did You Know?

Pronghorn

Did you know that pronghorns are the fastest mammals in the western hemisphere? They can run up to 70 mph, but do not like to jump fences! In the summer, pronghorn live along Antelope Flats Road, but in fall they migrate almost 200 miles to central Wyoming.