• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Moose-Wilson Road Closure

    The Moose-Wilson Road between Death Canyon Junction north to the intersection with the Murie Center Road is temporarily closed to motor vehicles, bicycles, skating, skateboards and similar devices. For current road conditions call 307-739-3682. More »

  • Multi-use Pathway Closures

    Intermittent closures of the park Multi-use Pathway System will occur through mid-October during asphalt sealing and safety improvement work. Pathway sections will reopen as work is completed. Follow the link for a map and more information. More »

Annual Roadside Clean-up on Thursday, June 9

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Date: June 7, 2011
Contact: Jackie Skaggs, 307.739.3393

June 7, 2011

11-40

Grand Teton National Park employees will join with park partners and concessioners to conduct the annual roadside clean-up on Thursday, June 9 from 8 a.m. to noon. This date is a bit later than previous years due to late season melting from a record winter snowpack.

Anyone driving through Grand Teton during Thursday morning should be alert for people walking along the roads and give clean-up crews a wide berth. Slow moving and parked vehicles may also be encountered.

Each year before the summer season is in full swing, park staff and Grand Teton Association employees-along with staff from the Grand Teton Lodge Company, Signal Mountain Lodge, Triangle X Ranch, and Flagg Ranch Resort-set aside a day to remove trash and unsightly debris from roads and turnouts to beautify Grand Teton before summer visitors arrive.

"Visitors and local residents can keep roadsides clean throughout the year by taking the time to place litter in garbage cans and dumpsters located throughout the park. As an added benefit, this simple, but responsible act also helps reduce the chance that bears may get food rewards," said Superintendent Mary Gibson Scott. "Everyone is encouraged to do their part in keeping Grand Teton National Park free of unsightly litter."

The Craig Thomas, Jenny Lake, Colter Bay, and Laurance S. Rockefeller Preserve visitor centers and park bookstores, as well as the interagency communication center and law enforcement patrols will continue normal operations while the clean-up work is underway.

Did You Know?

Close-up of a lodgepole pine cone

Did you know that lodgepole pine trees grow on glacial moraines in Jackson Hole? Glacial moraines are ridges of rocky debris left behind as Ice Age glaciers melted. The soil on these ridges retains moisture and is more hospitable to trees than the cobbly, porous soil on the outwash plain.