• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Moose-Wilson Road Closure

    The Moose-Wilson Road between Death Canyon Junction north to the intersection with the Murie Center Road is temporarily closed to motor vehicles, bicycles, skating, skateboards and similar devices. For current road conditions call 307-739-3682. More »

  • Multi-use Pathway Closures

    Intermittent closures of the park Multi-use Pathway System will occur through mid-October during asphalt sealing and safety improvement work. Pathway sections will reopen as work is completed. Follow the link for a map and more information. More »

Management

Grand Teton National Park was established in 1929; Jackson Hole National Monument was created in 1943. The two units were combined to become present-day Grand Teton National Park in 1950. John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway was established in 1972 to commemorate the philanthropic activities of John D. Rockefeller, Jr. and his generous donations of lands to the National Park System. The parkway is managed as a recreation area under the administration of Grand Teton National Park.

Grand Teton National Park is in many ways emblematic of the entire National Park System. Located in the heart of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, near the community of Jackson, Wyoming, this park is an icon for a myriad of nationally significant conservation issues including grazing, brucellosis, winter use, open space, fire management, wolf reintroduction, and water and air quality monitoring.

Grand Teton National Park is much more than a stunning mountain landscape. The park has enormously challenging issues, some of which have never been addressed. Park staff face these complex challenges at a time of limited federal budgets. In order to carry out the core mission of resource protection and visitor service, the park relies on a wide range of assistance from partner organizations, stakeholder groups, park volunteers, and a very active and involved citizenry.

Did You Know?

Close-up of a lodgepole pine cone

Did you know that lodgepole pine trees grow on glacial moraines in Jackson Hole? Glacial moraines are ridges of rocky debris left behind as Ice Age glaciers melted. The soil on these ridges retains moisture and is more hospitable to trees than the cobbly, porous soil on the outwash plain.