• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Area closure in effect for trails in the Jenny Lake Area

    A temporary area closure will be in effect for several trails in the Jenny Lake area due to construction activities involving helicopter-assisted transport of heavy material. The closure will last from October 27 through October 30, and possibly longer. More »

  • Multi-use Pathway Closures

    Intermittent closures of the park Multi-use Pathway System will occur through mid-October during asphalt sealing and safety improvement work. Pathway sections will reopen as work is completed. Follow the link for a map and more information. More »

  • Moose-Wilson Road Status

    The Moose-Wilson Road between the Death Canyon Road and the Murie Center Road is currently open to all traffic. The road may re-close at any time due to wildlife activity. For current road conditions call 307-739-3682. More »

Wildflowers

Glacier lilies in Cascade Canyon

Glacier lilies paint the landscape in the North Fork of Cascade Canyon.

The wildflowers of Grand Teton National Park usually bloom May through September. There are only about 60 continuous frost-free days a year in Jackson Hole, so the growing season is very short and the dominant blooming flowers change quickly from week to week.

Grand Teton National Park can be separated into three distinct zones: the sagebrush valley, the forest floor, and the alpine zone. Skyrocket gilia, larkspur, and indian paintbrush bloom in the valley as temperatures rise. Flowers like fireweed, columbine, monkshood, and the rare calypso orchid enjoy the moist environments found in forests. The flowers of the alpine zone grow close to the ground and the flowers are very small; examples include moss campion, alpine forget-me-not, and sky pilot.

Remember that observing and photographing wildflowers is achieved by bringing your eye to the wildflower and not the wildflower to your eye. Wildflowers within the national park are not to be picked so that they may be enjoyed by future visitors and provide habitat and food to wildlife.

To learn more about the park's wildflowers read the plant finding guide. This brochure provides information about what wildflowers will be blooming in each zone during what months.

Did You Know?

Pronghorn

Did you know that pronghorns are the fastest mammals in the western hemisphere? They can run up to 70 mph, but do not like to jump fences! In the summer, pronghorn live along Antelope Flats Road, but in fall they migrate almost 200 miles to central Wyoming.